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Vehicle Approach Security System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004502D
Publication Date: 2000-Dec-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Home security systems have progressed rapidly in the last decades with the accessibility of inexpensive technologies. A very basic, but effective security device is a motion trigger for turning on lights/ devices with in a house. This technique provides a simple thief deterrent as well as providing an owner with added safety through increased lighting.

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Vehicle Approach Security System

Home security systems have progressed rapidly in the last decades with the accessibility of inexpensive technologies. A very basic, but effective security device is a motion trigger for turning on lights/ devices with in a house. This technique provides a simple thief deterrent as well as providing an owner with added safety through increased lighting.

How to trigger an appliance switch with vehicle detection?

Conventional triggers utilize motion sensors or some type of beam sensor. These techniques offer a limited range and are activated with any movement in the monitored zone. This can be undesirable for users that only wish the system to be triggered by a vehicle.

The present invention is a method and apparatus incorporating existing inductor coil vehicle detection technology for the triggering property appliances or devices by vehicles traveling on a driveway. An inductive loop is simply a coil of wire embedded in the road's surface. To install the loop one lays the asphalt and then comes back and cuts a groove in the asphalt with a saw. The wire is laid in the groove and sealed with a rubbery compound. Inductive loops work by detecting a change of inductance. Therefore, when a large metal object, like a vehicle, passes over the coil a change in inductance is detected.

Figure 1a Side-view of Vehicle Approach System

Figure 1b Top-view of Vehicle Approach System

Figure 1a and Figure 1b illustrate an inductor coil 110 embedded in a section of a driveway 120. As a car 130 comes to travels along the driveway, it passes over inductor coil 110, thus causing a change in the inductance. This inductance change is detected by electronics 140, which are electrically connected to lights 150 located in and on a house 160. Electronics 140 switches lights 150 upon being triggered.