Browse Prior Art Database

Mixtures of Bensulfuron-methyl with Anilofos for Selective Weed Control in Rice

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004593D
Publication Date: 2001-Feb-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Mixtures of Bensulfuron-methyl with Anilofos for Selective Weed Control in Rice

This text was extracted from a WORD97 document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Mixtures of Bensulfuron methyl with Anilofos for Selective Weed Control in Rice

Mixtures of bensulfuron methyl (methyl 2-[[[[[(4,6-dimethoxy-2-pyrimidinyl)amino]carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]methyl]benzoate, Formula I) with anilofos (S-[2-[(4-chlorophenyl)(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-oxoethyl] O,O-dimethyl phosphorodithioate, Formula II) are surprisingly useful for controlling weeds in rice crops, particularly in paddy fields.

The following test example illustrates this utility.

Test Example

Plastic pots having 15-cm inside diameter were filled with a clay loam soil, fertilized with a 12-16-12 (N-P-K) fertilizer, and flooded. A day later, rice seedlings (Oryza sativa variety Nipponbare; approximately 2.2-leaf stage) that had been reared in a greenhouse were planted four single stem stocks per pot. Two of the seedlings were planted at 2-cm depth, and the other two were planted at 0-cm depth supported by vinyl ties. The 0-cm depth transplanting makes rice seedlings particularly vulnerable to herbicide injury. The pots were maintained in the greenhouse for 5 days, at which time the rice plants were at the 3-leaf stage. The water depth was then adjusted to 3 cm, and acetone solutions of the test chemicals were applied to the paddy water. The pots were maintained in the greenhouse for a further 15-20 days, and then the effect on rice was rated on a 0 to 100% scale, where 0 denotes no injury and 100 indicates complete death. The tests were replicated twice. Results for the rice transplanted to 0-cm depth are listed in Tables 1a and 1b as the mean responses of the two replicates, together with effects expected from the Colby equation. Observed and expected injury on the rice plants transplanted to 2-cm depth were all negligible (??5%) at the application rates listed in Tables 1a and 1b and are therefore not tabulated.

For testing weed control, a mixture of seeds of Monochoria vaginalis in soil and seeds of Schoenoplectus juncoides were sown on the soil surface in other pots. The pots were maintained in a greenhouse for 13 days, at which time M. vaginalis was at the 1-leaf stage and S. juncoides was at the 2-leaf stage. The water depth was then adjusted to 3 cm, and acetone solutions of the test chemicals were applied to the paddy water. The pots were grown in the greenhouse for a further 21 days, and then the effect on weeds was rated on a 0 to 100 scale, where 0 denotes no effect and 100% indicates complete control. Results are listed in Tables 2a and 2b as the mean responses of two replicates, together with effects expected from the Colby equation.

Colby's equation was used to calculate the expected additive herbicidal effect of the mixtures of bensulfuron methyl and anilofos. Colby's equation (Colby, S. R. "Calculating Synergistic and Antagonistic Responses of Herbicide Combinations," Weeds, 15(1), pp 20-22 (1967)) calculates the expected additive effect of herbicidal mixtures, and for ...