Browse Prior Art Database

Sending Voice Mail Messages in a Telephone via Email (Speech to Text Messaging)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004614D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Feb-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

SriGowri Vatticuti: AUTHOR

Abstract

Sending Voice Mail Messages in a Telephone via Email (Speech to Text Messaging)

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word 97 document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 88% of the total text.

Sending Voice Mail Messages in a Telephone via Email

(Speech to Text Messaging)

By

SriGowri Vatticuti

Current technology enables people to check their telephone answering machine messages through their phone carriers, but it still requires them to dial through a telephone to their home number to check the messages. By implementing my design ideology they need not dial to the telephone; instead, the phone can be programmed in such a way that the messages left on the answering machine can be sent to their email account in a text format. Thus they can check their messages from anywhere in the world either through their hand held devices, through their mobile phone browser or through any Internet enabled gadget. They need not miss their messages when they are away from home or when they are out of the country.

There are two ways to implement this idea:

Scenario 1:

The phone can be programmed in such a way that the audio message from the answering machine in the phone is transformed to a text format (speech to text) and sent as an email. To put it into the email account an Internet connection to the phone is required. The phone sends the email message through a computer that is connected to it or dials an Internet service provider, and emails the message. The user can then login and check his/her message from anywhere in the world. This is described in detail in the following sequence of events.

Sequence of Events for Scenario1:

0. The user provides the email address in his home telephone.

1. A caller calls the home telephone and leaves a message.

2. The telephone can send the caller's information in three different ways:

a. Reading the number from the caller ID and sending it as text.

b. Sending the audio message left in the answering machine as an audio file.

c. Reading the audio message and sending the text file.

The phone connects to a computer in the house that can have a local area network or a modem (can be a wireless modem or a bluetooth enabled device) and then sends the message to the email account.

3. The email message is delivered to an email server.

4. The user can login to his/her email account through a computer, laptop or through a mobile phone browser from anywhere in the world and view his/her messages.

Scenario 2:

Alternatively, the Message Switching Center (MSC) of the phone carrier can convert the voicemail message in the mailbox into a text message, which then can be forwarded as an email to an email address registered with the Message Switching Center by the user. The user can then login and check his/her message. This is described in detail in the following sequence of events.

Sequence of Events for Scenario2:

0. The user provides an email address to the telephone carrier.

1. A caller calls the home telephone and leaves a message in the call notes at the Message Switching Center.

2. The telephone carrier then sends the message left in the call notes as an email in any of the following ways.

a. Reading the number from the caller ID and sending it as te...