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SECTOR ANTENNA CONFIGURATION FOR ENHANCED LOCATION ACCURACY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004645D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Mar-15
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Mar-15
Document File: 1 page(s) / 5K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Slim Souissi: AUTHOR

Abstract

SECTOR ANTENNA CONFIGURATION FOR ENHANCED LOCATION ACCURACY

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SECTOR ANTENNA CONFIGURATION FOR ENHANCED LOCATION ACCURACY

by Slim Souissi

INTRODUCTION

Sectorization is used in cellular systems to increase capacity while minimizing interference. The configuration of sector antennae is done according to rules that simplify deployment and guarantee optimum RF network operation.

PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED

The simplest location finding technique uses cell id to locate the mobile unit. Knowledge of the location of the serving cell allows the system to locate the subscriber unit with an accuracy which is proportional to the cell size.

When sectors are used the location of the mobile unit can be detected within the sector boundaries. Special sector configurations can improve the accuracy on the position of the subscriber unit.

SOLUTION

Figure 1 shows a typical cellular layout with 6 sectors per cell and with a frequency reuse factor equal to 4. From this configuration, one can easily see that a mobile unit that is located between sector a3 and sector c6 may be located along the uncertainty border delimiting the two sectors.

We suggest the use of a special configuration for the sector antennae in order to minimize the uncertainty area for the location of the mobile unit. If we rotate the antenna bearing by an angle equal to half the sector angle, the uncertainty area is reduced by half.

LIMITATIONS

1. When reconfiguring the sector antenna according to the suggested solution, the system engineer should ensure that there is no degradation in C/I.

2. The technique can be used in areas where cells are deployed according to a linear layout.

In other words, a given cell should not have more than two neighboring cells.

[See accompanying PDF for Figures]