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IMPROVED USE OF THE CONVENTIONAL SIGNALING STACKER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004656D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Mar-20
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Mar-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 6K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Shailesh Mistry: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a mobile phone or two-way radio, caller IDs of unanswered calls are stored in the radio's memory stack for subsequent review by the user. The addition of another memory stack eliminates the problem of losing data on stack overflow and power down.

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IMPROVED USE OF THE CONVENTIONAL SIGNALING STACKER

by Shailesh Mistry and Karina Markarian

ABSTRACT

In a mobile phone or two-way radio, caller IDs of unanswered calls are stored in the radio's memory stack for subsequent review by the user. The addition of another memory stack eliminates the problem of losing data on stack overflow and power down.

INTRODUCTION

This paper describes an improvement of an existing mobile phone or radio feature the Missed Calls List.

PROBLEMS TO BE SOLVED

Problem 1: When the stack becomes full, the oldest message is deleted. Therefore the caller will be unaware that their message will never be acknowledged or even answered by the user.

Problem 2: The stack is deleted on power off so the user cannot get in touch with anyone that called previously, and the caller will not know that their call will remain unanswered.

PROPOSED SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEMS

PROBLEM 1

The current architecture uses one stack, but we propose a two-stack system. The radio will have memory stacks 'A' and 'B'. When stack A becomes full, the caller with the oldest message is sent a telegram stating that the user's stack is full and that their message will be deleted next. The telegram will be on the no-acknowledge type so no further processing is required by the user's radio.

Using this system the caller now knows that their message will be deleted soon and they can reassess if they really need to contact the user again and hence leave another message for them. If they do send another message, then the incoming call will be checked against the messages in stack A and, if it matches, then the message will be removed from stack A and placed in stack B.

At any time, there will only ever be one message from a particular caller in either stack A or B. Therefore, if a caller's message already exists in stack B and they send another message, then it will not be added to stack A. This gives a total stack size of A plus B and also means that the caller will know if their message will be seen or not.

PROBLEM 2

Following on from the problem above, we can make stack B part of the dynamic memory so that it remains intact on power off. During power off, the radio can be programmed to send a telegram to each caller on stack A stating that the user has now switched off. The telegram would be of the no-acknowledgement type so that the user's radio would not have to wait for any replies.

Using this system the callers now know that the user has powered off and they need not wait for any reply to their earlier call. The user also knows that when they power up again there will still be a list of the most persistent callers, in stack B.