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THE 'PUSH TO JOIN' BUTTON FOR COLLABORATIVE WIRELESS SYSTEMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004681D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Apr-04
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

David Williams: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A rapid preference-based mechanism is proposed for joining and leaving collaborative and wirelessly supported groups.

This text was extracted from a Rich Text Format document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 61% of the total text.

THE 'PUSH TO JOIN' BUTTON FOR COLLABORATIVE WIRELESS SYSTEMS

by David Williams, Johnathan Gibbs and Liang Liu

ABSTRACT

A rapid preference-based mechanism is proposed for joining and leaving collaborative and wirelessly supported groups.

INTRODUCTION

Distributed individuals using wireless terminals often wish to collaborate with others who share common work or leisure goals. Such collaboration may involve the exchange of voice, images, haptic information and raw data.

PROBLEMS TO BE SOLVED

Group-based collaboration is a dynamic and transient process, e.g. ad hoc group formation on large 'fire-grounds', teenagers joining and leaving groups at school. In order to be effective and acceptable to end users, wireless systems must provide support for these kinds of groups and in a way which allows 'common-goal'-based social grouping.

Since goals and interests change over time, groups should be transient in nature: reforming and forming many times. In addition, users will not have time to manually affiliate themselves to an existing group or initiate and 'advertise' a new group.

Current, 'talk-group' based radio systems such as TETRA rely on long-term and a priori allocation of terminals to groups. Any changes of group membership are done manually at the discretion of the dispatcher or fleet controller. There is no notion of a 'personality' associated with each terminal, e.g. user's operational role, preferences, or interests. Group formation is therefore not ad hoc and manual: this makes the support of plastic group behavior impossible.

Group activities are prevalent in the Internet. Newsgroups allow ad hoc membership of an interest group and may be manually searched by a user's preference, e.g. using deja-news to search for all groups with 'human factors' in their title.

However, newsgroups are not widely used in wireless systems, they are not proactive in that they can detect who has accessed a particular group and then forward messages to them (a type of group-based collaboration) and they are not real-time communication channels. Newsgroups represent more of a group information repository.

Mailing lists offer a more proactive service, in that a group member can broadcast information to all other group members. The deficiencies here are the difficulty in making group membership transient and the lack of relevance that many messages may have. Users must join mailing lists on a long-term basis using the 'subscribe' process. Also, the selection of a mailing list is a relatively arbitrary process based on the list's general expression of interest.

PROPOSED SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEMS

The invention is a button activated system which supports dynamic and transient group affiliation by transmitting users' locally stored interests and preferences, thus allowing dynamic and preference-based affiliation.

Preferences and interests are generated both by explicit user requests, e.g. 'I want to meet people who like shopping', and implicitly by monitoring the users' activities, e.g. ...