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TECHNIQUE FOR USING WIRE BONDS BETWEEN DEVICE AND BOARD AS ALIGNMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004735D
Publication Date: 2001-Apr-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Optical circuits offer advantages over traditional electrical circuits, particularly, in their perceived ability to provide higher speed data transmissions. Such transmissions may take place not only between machines (e.g., computers), but also within machines, in which case board-to-board and chip-to-chip data communication using optical circuits can be utilized. Optical circuits have been incorporated in semiconductor structures often used with electrical circuits. Optical circuits in semiconductor materials, include diodes (e.g., edge emitting diodes (EEDs) or edge emitting lasers (EELs)) and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). In a conversion area of a light signal and electrical signal, a light transmission path including an optical fiber and an optical waveguide, or a photoelectron conversion element (e.g., photodiode, laser diode, etc.) may be used

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TECHNIQUE FOR USING WIRE BONDS BETWEEN DEVICE AND BOARD AS ALIGNMENT

Optical circuits offer advantages over traditional electrical circuits, particularly, in their perceived ability to provide higher speed data transmissions. Such transmissions may take place not only between machines (e.g., computers), but also within machines, in which case board-to-board and chip-to-chip data communication using optical circuits can be utilized. Optical circuits have been incorporated in semiconductor structures often used with electrical circuits. Optical circuits in semiconductor materials, include diodes (e.g., edge emitting diodes (EEDs) or edge emitting lasers (EELs)) and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). In a conversion area of a light signal and electrical signal, a light transmission path including an optical fiber and an optical waveguide, or a photoelectron conversion element (e.g., photodiode, laser diode, etc.) may be used. A circuit for optical information processing (e.g., an optical electronic integrated circuit (OEIC), typically may include a combination of a light transmission path or photoelectron conversion element(s), and a circuit (e.g., an integrated circuit for controlling an electronic element, processing electronic signal, and/or circuits for driving electronic part). A transceiver, for example, may comprise signal circuitry for receiving or transmitting signals to or from a photoelectron conversion element such as a receiving diode or a transmitting diode laser.

Efforts are focused at aligning individual components of an optical and/or optical electrical circuits into an assembly. These efforts, include aligning optical fibers and waveguides to one another and/or to circuit (e.g., transceiver) substrates. In the case of communicating an optical signal between a fiber and a waveguide or transceiver, alignment is important because the optical signal must be received/transmitted within an acceptance cone or the optical signal is reflected.

Prior techniques of aligning, for example, waveguides with fiber ribbons or transceivers include mounting the devices on a submount base and coupling the devices with epoxy. The epoxy, while soft or malleable may be used as part of the alignment technique by positioning the active/passive devices in respect to one another within six degrees of freedom. In this context, six degrees of freedom is a term defining linear movement in either direction along each of the three mutually perpendicular axes (e.g., x, y, and z axes), and rotation about each of the three axes in either direction. The term "degree of freedom" means that movement on any axis does not exclude any other simultaneous movement on any other axis. Thus, a six degrees of freedom device can interpret all possible motions within the three dimensional world.

A technique for bonding an optical circuit structure to a submount assembly is described. The technique involves using wire bonds between an optical circuit device and a circui...