Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

PRIVATE AND GROUP VIDEO-ON-DEMAND SERVICES OVER WIRELESS IP VIA WEB-ENABLED H.323

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004743D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Apr-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Apr-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 7K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Tyrone Bekiares: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

PRIVATE AND GROUP VIDEO-ON-DEMAND SERVICES OVER WIRELESS IP VIA WEB-ENABLED H.323

This text was extracted from a RTF document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

PRIVATE AND GROUP VIDEO-ON-DEMAND SERVICES OVER WIRELESS IP VIA WEB-ENABLED H.323

by Tyrone Bekiares and Donald Newberg

BACKGROUND

To provide a usable video-on-demand service over a wireless IP pipe, a wireless system must treat video-on-demand streams as it does live video streams. Like live video streams, video-on-demand streams must be handled by the wireless network in a certain way particularly in terms of quality of service.

Additionally, the same set of call control services available for live video streams should also be made available to video-on-demand streams. This would enable users, for example, to start a video-on-demand session to a group of users, instead of just an individual user.

Though commercial video-on-demand over IP services exist, none are suitable for use in a wireless environment. In particular, they do not include provisions to provide quality of service over a wireless network (e.g. reserving time slots). Porting existing video-on-demand services to a wireless IP network would require modifying the quality of service mechanism to understand two different sets of rules for live video and video-on-demand streams.

Using an existing video-on-demand service without modification on a wireless network would also not be prudent.

Consider, for example, what happens when a subscriber drives out of RF coverage. The video-on-demand server (located in the infrastructure) should stop sending the associated streams. Additionally, any RF resources assigned to the streams should be released. Today's video-on-demand over IP technology does not include the capability to do this.

Additionally, video-on-demand services available today are private call centric. One can envision a scenario where one user may wish to initiate a video-on-demand stream not only to him or herself, but also to an entire group of users.

INVENTION

We have designed and implemented a video-on-demand service built around an IP-based call control protocol, such as H.323. By doing so, the RF network need only be aware of one set of rules for streaming video. Today's video-on-demand services use proprietary standards or standards designed exclusively for this service.

Our invention documents a way to handle a video-on-demand request as any other video or voice call request. This makes video-on-demand a trivial addition to any wireless IP system already supporting video and voice calls.

Additionally, the video-on-demand service can now take advantage of all the features available to live video streams. This includes group call services and QOS.

The video-on-demand stream would be setup using the standard H.323 call control mechanisms. The network treats the video-on-demand stream as just another H.323 live video stream.

1. The call is initiated by clicking on a web page hyperlink. The hyperlink is encoded with the name of the video and/or audio file...