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METHOD FOR OPTIMIZING TRAFFIC PATTERNS BASED ON BROADCAST VEHICLE LOCATION INFORMATION PF2119NA

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004745D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Apr-26
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Apr-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Ken Smelcer: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This paper describes the idea of dynamically adjusting traffic patterns using the information from a wireless Vehicle Collision Avoidance System (VCAS). The improvement is based on the ability of wireless-based VCAS-enabled vehicles to transmit their current location, direction, and speed. The traffic light system would use this information to adjust timing of traffic lights to increase traffic throughput and to provide better support for passage of emergency vehicles.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

METHOD FOR OPTIMIZING TRAFFIC PATTERNS BASED ON BROADCAST VEHICLE LOCATION INFORMATION PF2119NA

by Ken Smelcer, S. Andrew Hopper and Jack Gipson

ABSTRACT

This paper describes the idea of dynamically adjusting traffic patterns using the information from a wireless Vehicle Collision Avoidance System (VCAS). The improvement is based on the ability of wireless-based VCAS-enabled vehicles to transmit their current location, direction, and speed. The traffic light system would use this information to adjust timing of traffic lights to increase traffic throughput and to provide better support for passage of emergency vehicles.

INTRODUCTION

One common problem with traffic management in today's metropolitan areas is that traffic control systems such as stop lights and traffic warning signs have limited interaction with the vehicles in the intersection. Stop light timing can be changed based on time of day, or by using optical or pressure sensors, but it cannot adapt to unforeseen peak and ebb traffic flows. In addition, traffic planners need accurate information on traffic flow, including time of day and intersection backlog. This information is difficult to collect on a continuous basis, due to the need to deploy special sensing equipment to perform these measurements.

Vehicle collision avoidance systems (VCAS) are used for the detection and prevention of vehicle collisions. Advanced VCAS would integrate GPS and vehicle sensors to allow vehicles to broadcast their current location, direction, and speed to allow other vehicles to predict potential collisions. This information would also be used by the fixed traffic infrastructure to dynamically adjust traffic flow through intersections. This paper discusses how an intersection equipped with VCAS along with a topographical knowledge of its streets and the locations of its neighboring intersections could use the vehicle VCAS information to know how many vehicles were entering and/or queued at the intersection.

DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD

Intersection traffic control systems would be made part of the VCAS network, allowing them to receive vehicle location information. They would then use VCAS information to adapt their behavior based on traffic flow density, backlog, and/or detection of incoming emergency vehicles. This system would need the following:

Each intersection control system would require some basic topographical information to map GPS information to intersection access points (i.e., streets).

Intersections close together would need to coordinate their activities to avoid violations of traffic plan timing rules governing a set of intersections

The system would monitor each approaching vehicle. It would use this information, along with its current state of the traffic lights and cars waiting to enter the intersection, to determine if it should modify the timing/state of the traffic lights controll...