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Host-host control message formats (RFC0022)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004847D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2006-Sep-30
Document File: 3 page(s) / 5K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

V.G. Cerf: AUTHOR

Abstract

NWG/RFC 11 has been modified at UCLA; and will be republished. In the meantime, it seems important to report a new control message format which does not use 7-bit ASCII character mode of transmission.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 48% of the total text.

Network Working Group                                          Vint Cerf Request for Comments: 22                                            UCLA                                                         October 17, 1969

                    Host-Host Control Message Formats

   NWG/RFC 11 has been modified at UCLA; and will be republished.  In    the meantime, it seems important to report a new control message    format which does not use 7-bit ASCII character mode of transmission.

   All Host-Host control messages consist of sequences of 8-bit bytes of    the form:

   <control byte> <parameter byte l> ... <parameter byte n>

   It is reasonable to transmit more than one control message in any    given packet, although this is not mandatory.

   Presently, 9 control messages have been defined by UCLA; these are    given in the table below along with their parameters.  The    interpretation is given from the point of view of the transmitting    host. ("L" or "Li" mean Link#, and are binary values.)

   Control byte     Parameter      Interpretation

    <0>             <L>           Please establish primary connection;                                   our output link # is L

    <1>             <L,> <L2>     Please establish auxiliary connection                                   parallel to our primary output link L.                                   The auxiliary output link is L2.

    <2>             <L1> <L2>     DK primary.  Your primary output link                                   to us was L; our primary output link                                   to you is L2.

    <3>             <L1> <L2>     OK auxiliary.  Your auxiliary output                                   link is Li, our auxiliary output link                                   is L2.

    <4>             <L>           Not OK primary.  We cannot establish a                                   primary connection.  Your primary                                   output link number was L.

    <5>             <Li> <L2>     Not OK auxiliary.  We cannot establish                                   an auxiliary connection.  Your primary                                   output link no was L2.

Cerf                             ...