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Transition Mechanisms for IPv6 Hosts and Routers (RFC2893)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005012D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Jul-13
Document File: 30 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

R. Gilligan: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This document specifies IPv4 compatibility mechanisms that can be implemented by IPv6 hosts and routers. These mechanisms include providing complete implementations of both versions of the Internet Protocol (IPv4 and IPv6), and tunneling IPv6 packets over IPv4 routing infrastructures. They are designed to allow IPv6 nodes to maintain complete compatibility with IPv4, which should greatly simplify the deployment of IPv6 in the Internet, and facilitate the eventual transition of the entire Internet to IPv6. This document obsoletes RFC 1933.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 5% of the total text.

Network Working Group R. Gilligan Request for Comments: 2893 FreeGate Corp. Obsoletes: 1933 E. Nordmark Category: Standards Track Sun Microsystems, Inc.

August 2000

Transition Mechanisms for IPv6 Hosts and Routers

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document specifies IPv4 compatibility mechanisms that can be implemented by IPv6 hosts and routers. These mechanisms include providing complete implementations of both versions of the Internet Protocol (IPv4 and IPv6), and tunneling IPv6 packets over IPv4 routing infrastructures. They are designed to allow IPv6 nodes to maintain complete compatibility with IPv4, which should greatly simplify the deployment of IPv6 in the Internet, and facilitate the eventual transition of the entire Internet to IPv6. This document obsoletes RFC 1933.

Gilligan Nordmark Standards Track [Page 1]

RFC 2893 IPv6 Transition Mechanisms August 2000

Table of Contents

1. Introduction............................................. 2 1.1. Terminology......................................... 3

1.2. Structure of this Document.......................... 5 2. Dual IP Layer Operation.................................. 6 2.1. Address Configuration............................... 7 2.2. DNS................................................. 7

2.3. Advertising Addresses in the DNS.................... 8 3. Common Tunneling Mechanisms.............................. 9 3.1. Encapsulation....................................... 11 3.2. Tunnel MTU and Fragmentation........................ 11 3.3. Hop Limit........................................... 13 3.4. Handling IPv4 ICMP errors........................... 13 3.5. IPv4 Header Construction............................ 15 3.6. Decapsulation....................................... 16 3.7. Link-Local Addresses................................ 17

3.8. Neighbor Discovery over Tunnels..................... 18 4. Configured Tunneling..................................... 18 4.1. Default Configured Tunnel........................... 19 4.2. Default Configured Tunnel using IPv4 "Anycast Address" 19

4.3. Ingress Filtering................................... 20 5. Automatic Tunneling...................................... 20 5.1. IPv4-Compatible Address Format...................... 20 5.2. IPv4-Compatible Address Configuration............... 21 5.3. Automatic Tunneling Operation....................... 22 5.4. Use With Default Configured Tunnels................. 22 5.5. Source Addr...