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Wireless Multi-Purpose Inter-Vehicle Data Sharing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005021D
Publication Date: 2001-Jul-16
Document File: 1 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Inter-vehicle data sharing will allow the entire active fleet of vehicles to exchange useful information between vehicles. The critical feature of this technology is that a vehicle's function can be initiated and continuously improved by sharing data with other vehicles.

This text was extracted from a WORD97 document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 75% of the total text.

Wireless Multi-Purpose Inter-Vehicle Data Sharing

Inter-vehicle data sharing will allow the entire active fleet of vehicles to exchange useful information between vehicles. The critical feature of this technology is that a vehicle's function can be initiated and continuously improved by sharing data with other vehicles.

Multi-purpose inter-vehicle data sharing proposes that each vehicle be equipped with a wireless transceiver for short-range communication with other vehicles and with fixed transceiving stations. The activity of the transceiver is transparent to the vehicle operator. The transceivers can be used to exchange any information that may be useful to other vehicles. There are many uses for such transceivers. Some examples are:

High-option-content vehicles can share useful information with lower content vehicles. For example, a vehicle equipped with an outside temperature sensor would be able to broadcast temperature data indicating the possibility of road icing to nearby vehicles which are not equipped with an outside temperature sensor. The receiving vehicles' ABS modules could then switch to a different anti-lock strategy which has been fine-tuned for icy conditions and a warning message can be displayed on the receiving vehicles' radio display.

Lower content vehicles can use their transceiver to request the use of options on higher content vehicles. For example, a vehicle which is not equipped with the Rescu system can broadcast a request to other vehicles which may have the Rescu system. If the Rescu system is present on a nearby vehicle, it can be used to report an airbag deployment in the requesting vehicle. If three or more nearby vehicles are equipped with the Rescu system, they could triangulate the requesting vehicle's exact location.

Updates to module software can be done without the owner taking the vehicle to a dealer. Software updates would originate from fixed transceiving locations such as dealerships, oil change shops or fast food restaurants. The software update would be received by any nearby vehicle (the primary receiver). Vehicles that have received the update can query other vehicles to determine whether or not they have received the software update and whether or not the update is appropriate for the second-hand receiver. If the second-hand receiver has not gotten the update, the primary receiver would provide the update. Module software would be updated very quickly using this method, which mimics the spread of an epidemic, only in this case the "epidemic" is beneficial.

Real-world vehicle usage data can be easily collected using fixed transceiving stations at dealerships, oil change shops or fast food restaurants.

Vehicles involved in accidents can broadcast relevant information to nearby vehicles, creating a virtual "black box" for accident reconstruction and real-world crash data collection. Accident data can be collected any tim...