Browse Prior Art Database

METHOD TO REDUCE AND DISPLAY WEB GRAPHICS ON A WIRELESS DEVICE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005039D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Aug-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Matt Morriss: AUTHOR

Abstract

METHOD TO REDUCE AND DISPLAY WEB GRAPHICS ON A WIRELESS DEVICE

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word 97 document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 70% of the total text.

METHOD TO REDUCE AND DISPLAY WEB GRAPHICS

ON A WIRELESS DEVICE

By Matt Morriss

INTRODUCTION

Many wireless web browsers have difficulty properly displaying web pages with graphics that were not formatted for the small screens of portable devices. Wireless web pages may display correctly on one device, but may be displayed improperly or not at all on another device with different capabilities. What is needed is a way to tailor the graphic content of the page to the capabilities of the device.

DESCRIPTION

A wireless device requests a web page from a sever or gateway. With this request, the device also sends information about its screen size and graphic capabilities. The server then determines, for each image on the page, whether the image can be reduced to fit on the screen of the device and still be readable. This is done by calculating the amount that the image would have to be reduced (in percent) in order to fit on the screen, and then comparing this amount to a reduction threshold that indicates how much the image can be reduced before it becomes unreadable. If the image must be reduced below the threshold then there is no reason to send it, since the device will not be able to render it properly. This threshold would be a function of the size of the original image and the maximum resolution of the wireless device, though other factors might also be considered. If an image that is inline on the page can be displayed inline on the device and still be readable, then it will be. If the image will be too small when displayed inline, but can be reasonably seen full-screen on the wireless device, then a link is provided on the wireless page to display the image full-screen. Optionally, selecting the image again could display it full size, with the ability to pan around the image.

In addition to looking at the original size of the image and the resolution that the device can support, it might also be good to consider other aspects of the image when determining the reduction threshold at which the image is no longer readable. For example, simple images that contain large elements might still look acceptable when significantly reduced, while more complex images with smaller elements and words might become unintelligible when reduced by the same amount. This distinction may become important when determining if an image can be displayed inline with the web page or must be shown full screen by providing a link. If a tag could be incorporated into the web page with the image to indicate the level of complexity of the image, as determined by the web page designer, then the server could take the image complexity value into account when processing the web page to be sent to the device. It would likely also be possible to use image processing techniques on the image for the server to measure its complexity without the use of a tag.

Additionally, users could set the screen capabilities to be lower than actual device capabilities in order to speed up web browsing (i.e., ...