Browse Prior Art Database

Utilization Of External Memory & Processing Resources By A Portable Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005043D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Aug-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Steven Goldberg: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Utilization Of External Memory & Processing Resources By A Portable Device

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word 97 document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

Utilization Of External Memory Processing Resources By A Portable Device

By Steven Goldberg Jheroen Dorenbosch

PN1000AA

Some applications in portable devices require more memory or processing capability than the device has available. The device however may have the means to wirelessly communicate with devices or networks that have suitable resources available. This article outlines the means for the device to identify and effectively utilize these resources.

Figure 1 gives examples of the basic components required. Each potential resource has characteristics associated with it. As shown in the flow chart of figure 2, the device would have to determine if the needs of the application and those of an available resource are compatible.

There are of course questions of continuity and potential loss of information. These would have to be part of the application requirements and profile matching process. The original application for extending instant messaging dialogs is suitable for potential loss if the conversation is of a casual nature. If the user indicates however that this is a dialog that must be retained, the offboard use may best be restricted to a device which is known to be accompanying the user.

Several methods can be used to select a storage device that will be available again when the data needs to be retrieved.

1) The user's device is configured with the ID of other devices that will supposedly be available.

2) The device uses a storage device that is likely to remain nearby. Such a device can be found as follows:

· The device discovers all nearby devices.

· It recognizes nearby storage devices.

· It monitors the presence and builds statistics on which storage devices remain nearby.

· When looking for storage, it selects a storage device that has high statistical presence.

3) The user's device uses a storage that is likely to be nearby when needed.

· The device classifies the type of data that is to be stored, or the application types that store data (like an application type used in the car to gather driving directions and maps).

· As above, the device monitors the presence of nearby devices.

· It now builds statistics on devices that are present when each data/application type requires storage.

· When looking for storage, it selects a storage device that has high statistical presence (for example, it will store maps and driving directions in the storage area of the car's auxiliary computer).

In spite of all the above smarts, the chosen storage device may not always be nearby when the stored data is needed. Several actions can be taken when stored data can not be retrieved:

4) The device warns the user with a description of the device that contains the data.

(This implies that devices exchange a user-friendly description for future reference, like "the auxiliary computer in the Honda").

5) The device contacts the storage device via the WAN or by cellular system (The user may be in the other car. The user's device or the auxiliary computer in the other car ...