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UTILIZING BISTATIXÔ TECHNOLOGY WITHIN PERIODICALS TO LINK INFORMATION WITH A READERS INTERESTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005056D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Aug-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Aug-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Joseph F. Wodka: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

UTILIZING BISTATIXÔ TECHNOLOGY WITHIN PERIODICALS TO LINK INFORMATION WITH A READERS INTERESTS

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word 97 document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 40% of the total text.

UTILIZING BISTATIX( TECHNOLOGY WITHIN PERIODICALS TO LINK INFORMATION WITH A READER'S INTERESTS

By Joseph F. Wodka, Richard S. Rachwalski, Mark P. Lill, Bruce C. Eastmond

Readers of newspapers and other periodicals encounter articles that limit the amount of information being conveyed because of space and information transfer constraints. Further, many readers have a limited interest in any particular article. Hence in order to attract a large number of readers, the article must be concise and limited in nature. Readers that wish or require more information must utilize a number of sources or services to obtain the desired information.

Generally, this may involve a number of different sources including other periodicals and online news sources that typically require a fair amount of time to obtain the desired information. In addition, "bingo cards" need to be filled out in many trade journals for requesting information. This method is time consuming and often mistakes are made in recording the appropriate number of the requested article.

The Internet, particularly the worldwide web, has become a significant access point for the retrieval of information. Information on an Internet site is stored in the form of pages that can be accessed by entering the site's unique protocol address or Universe Resource Locator (URL). With web access becoming an alternative for accessing information, many publishers have started to embed a URL within the article for the user. This method however requires the reader to either to be online at the time they are reading the article, or to write down the URL, or to save the article for retrieval at a later time. Mistakes in recording the URL can be made, and misplacement of both the URL and article can occur. The method also requires the user to hunt through the entire periodical in order to make note of the articles of interest.

Recently, publishers have taken to printing a barcode that incorporates the URL within in order to avoid mistakes made by users either in writing down the URL or during the entry of the data into a URL locator within the user's browser window. While this method addresses some of the issues, it does not solve the problem of a user needing to search the entire periodical for articles of interest in order to obtain more information.

What is needed is a method and apparatus that permits subscribers to receive filtered and non-filtered URL information without requiring the user to transcribe it or search for the pertinent information.

Motorola's BiStatix(tm) RF identification (RFID) technology provides this capability. Customized URL information retrieval can be tailored for each subscriber to a magazine by adding the tag in the address label. The embedded BiStatix(tm) tag has no independent power source such as a battery. It is powered by the energy generated by the interrogation signal from a BiStatix(tm) data collection module (RF reader). Existing printed material can be integrated with the technology...