Browse Prior Art Database

Issue Tracking and Disposition Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005120D
Publication Date: 2001-Aug-15
Document File: 4 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The disclosed process describes how the defect reports are entered into the database, how they are tracked during their lifetime, and how they are dispositioned. The process covers actions by users and database administrators to provide change control and to improve defect handling efficiency.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 47% of the total text.

Issue Tracking and Disposition Process

Disclosed is a process for tracking defect reports. Benefits include:

Improved communication

Improved change control

Improved defect-handling efficiency

Improved product quality

Decreased product time to market

The disclosed process describes how the defect reports are entered into the database, how they are tracked during their lifetime, and how they are dispositioned. The process covers actions by users and database administrators to provide change control and to improve defect-handling efficiency.

Defect tracking is very important to the success of a project. Without efficient and reliable defect tracking, team members may spend time trying to find needed information or on duplicate efforts. These delays make meeting aggressive schedules very difficult, if not impossible.

Defect-tracking reports are stored in a database that is accessible to all users. It is used to store the reports, track modifications to the reports, and archive the reports after the defect has been closed.

Each defect report has several attributes, which are stored in fields in the database record corresponding to the report. The attributes required by the disclosed process disclosure include the following:

State Either OPEN or CLOSED

Status The current phase the report is in. These phases are detailed in Table 1 below.

Owner This person controls the change to the next phase. They may or may not be actively working on the defect.

Figure 1 describes the life cycle of a defect report. Each report exists in one of two states: OPEN or CLOSED. An open report is one that is currently being tracked and has not been resolved. After the report is resolved, it becomes closed. Each report has a phase that describes its current place in the life cycle process. Possible phases include the following (see Table 1):

New The owner has not begun investigating the defect.

Investigating The owner is determining if there is a fix for the defect.

No Action The defect cannot be fixed, or the defect is found to not exist.

Duplicate The same defect has already been entered.

Feature Implemented The owner has fixed the defect.

Verified It has been proven that the defect is fixed.

Pooled The defect cannot be resolved for the current project, and will be investigated in a future project or closed if it can't be addressed.

In Figure 1, the defect begins the process life cycle when it is created in the OPEN state. Any user of the system can open a new defect. However, the Quality Lead usually opens the defect reports as problems are encountered during the testing process. The report begins in the New phase, and from there moves through the intervening phases until it finally reaches the CLOSED state. The bold text in the ovals correspond to phase names. The text in square brackets denotes the owner of the report during that phase of the life cycle.

The following table describes the reason for the transitions between the various phases of the life cycle:

Table1. Defect report life-cycle ph...