Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Design for a shock-tolerant mounting for compact flash devices with isolation mounts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005130D
Publication Date: 2001-Aug-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a design for a shock-tolerant mounting for compact flash devices with isolation mounts. Benefits include improved resiliency and decreased mechanical damage from shock and vibration and reduced reliance on cache.

This text was extracted from a WORD97 document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Design for a shock-tolerant mounting for compact flash devices with isolation mounts

Disclosed is a design for a shock-tolerant mounting for compact flash devices with isolation mounts. Benefits include improved resiliency and decreased mechanical damage from shock and vibration and reduced reliance on cache.

Compact Flash (CF) devices are retained in a metal cage that is attached to the structure of a host device such as a camera or MP3 digital audio player. Conventional devices incorporate the rigid mounting of the cage to the host's structure. The disclosed design uses a combination of viscous, semi-viscous and compliant (spring) elements to mechanically isolate the CF assembly from the shock or vibration energy otherwise transmitted when the host device is dropped or shaken (see Figure 1). The function is analogous to the way that a car's shock absorbers and springs keep the driver from feeling bumps and potholes or the way in which hydraulic engine mounts keep the steering wheel from shaking as the car's engine vibrates.

Virtually all conventional CF devices are solid state and resilient to a modest level of shock and vibration. However, this resiliency is beginning to decrease as companies develop microdrives (~1-inch hard disk drives) and similar devices with moving mechanical parts. Basic physics dictates that dropping a host device, such as an MP3 player, transmits some level of acceleration to the CF device. This force can displace the read/write head, and speed up or slow down the magnetic platter. This displacement could cause the head to bump the platter hard enough to damage either the head or the platter. Another possibility is that the data stream could be momentarily interrupted.

To the extent possible, CF manufacturers may try to isolate the head and minimize mass to lessen the mechanical damage. Some amount of cache and error correcting logic to reduce the errors perceived by the user may be introduced into the product. However, by mechanically isolating the entire CF cage, the disclosed design supplies approximately 10 times the distance (2-6 mm vs. 0.2mm) in which to absorb energy as compared to a similar effort within a conventional CF device. The improved isolation presents an opportunity to reduce the reliance on cache.

Fig. 1

Disclosed anonymously