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Next Steps for the IP QoS Architecture (RFC2990)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005184D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Aug-17
Document File: 25 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

G. Huston: AUTHOR

Abstract

While there has been significant progress in the definition of Quality of Service (QoS) architectures for internet networks, there are a number of aspects of QoS that appear to need further elaboration as they relate to translating a set of tools into a coherent platform for end-to-end service delivery. This document highlights the outstanding architectural issues relating to the deployment and use of QoS mechanisms within internet networks, noting those areas where further standards work may assist with the deployment of QoS internets.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 5% of the total text.

Network Working Group G. Huston Request for Comments: 2990 Telstra Category: Informational November 2000

Next Steps for the IP QoS Architecture

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

While there has been significant progress in the definition of Quality of Service (QoS) architectures for internet networks, there are a number of aspects of QoS that appear to need further elaboration as they relate to translating a set of tools into a coherent platform for end-to-end service delivery. This document highlights the outstanding architectural issues relating to the deployment and use of QoS mechanisms within internet networks, noting those areas where further standards work may assist with the deployment of QoS internets.

This document is the outcome of a collaborative exercise on the part of the Internet Architecture Board.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction ........................................... 2 2. State and Stateless QoS ................................ 4 3. Next Steps for QoS Architectures ....................... 6 3.1 QoS-Enabled Applications ........................... 7 3.2 The Service Environment ............................ 9 3.3 QoS Discovery ...................................... 10 3.4 QoS Routing and Resource Management ................ 10 3.5 TCP and QoS ........................................ 11 3.6 Per-Flow States and Per-Packet classifiers ......... 13 3.7 The Service Set .................................... 14 3.8 Measuring Service Delivery ......................... 14 3.9 QoS Accounting ..................................... 15 3.10 QoS Deployment Diversity .......................... 16 3.11 QoS Inter-Domain signaling ........................ 17

Huston Informational [Page 1]

RFC 2990 Next Steps for QoS Architecture November 2000

3.12 QoS Deployment Logistics .......................... 17 4. The objective of the QoS architecture .................. 18 5. Towards an end-to-end QoS architecture ................. 19 6. Conclusions ............................................ 21 7. Security Considerations ................................ 21 8. References ............................................. 22

9. Acknowledgments ........................................ 23 10. Author's Address ....................................... 23 11. Full Copyright Statement ............................... 24

1. Introduction

The default service offering associated with the Internet is characterized as a best-effort variable service response. Within this service profile the network makes no attempt to actively differentiate its service response between the traffic streams generated by concurrent users of the network. As the load generated by the active traffic flows within the network varies, the network's best effort service response will also vary.