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Format of the RSVP DCLASS Object (RFC2996)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005190D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Aug-17
Document File: 10 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

Y. Bernet: AUTHOR

Abstract

Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) signaling may be used to request Quality of Service (QoS) services and enhance the manageability of application traffic's QoS in a differentiated service (diff-serv or DS) network. When using RSVP with DS networks it is useful to be able to carry carry Differentiated Services Code Points (DSCPs) in RSVP message objects. One example of this is the use of RSVP to arrange for the marking of packets with a particular DSCP upstream from the DS network's ingress point, at the sender or at a previous network's egress router.

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Network Working Group Y. Bernet Request for Comments: 2996 Microsoft Category: Standards Track November 2000

Format of the RSVP DCLASS Object

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) signaling may be used to request Quality of Service (QoS) services and enhance the manageability of application traffic's QoS in a differentiated service (diff-serv or DS) network. When using RSVP with DS networks it is useful to be able to carry carry Differentiated Services Code Points (DSCPs) in RSVP message objects. One example of this is the use of RSVP to arrange for the marking of packets with a particular DSCP upstream from the DS network's ingress point, at the sender or at a previous network's egress router.

The DCLASS object is used to represent and carry DSCPs within RSVP messages. This document specifies the format of the DCLASS object and briefly discusses its use.

1. Introduction

This section describes the mechanics of using RSVP [RSVP] signaling and the DCLASS object for effecting admission control and applying QoS policy within a Differentiated Service network [DS]. It assumes standard RSVP senders and receivers, and a diff-serv network somewhere in the path between sender and receiver. At least one RSVP aware network element resides in the diff-serv network. This network element may be a policy enforcement point (PEP) [RAP] or may simply act as an admission control agent for the network, admitting or denying resource requests based on the availability of resources. In either case, this network element interacts with RSVP messages arriving from outside the DS network, accepting resource requests

Bernet Standards Track [Page 1]

RFC 2996 Format of the RSVP DCLASS Object November 2000

from RSVP-aware senders and receivers, and conveying the DS network's admission control and resource allocation decisions to the higher- level RSVP. The network element is typically a router and will be considered to be so for the purpose of this document. This model is described fully in [INTDIFF].

1.1 Use of the DCLASS Object to Carry Upstream Packet Marking

Information

A principal usage of the DCLASS object is to carry DSCP information between a DS network and upstream nodes that may wish to mark packets with DSCP values. Briefly, the sender composes a standard RSVP PATH message and sends it towards the receiver. At some point the PATH message reaches the DS network. The PATH message traverses one or more network elements that are PEPs and/or admission control agents for the diff-serv network. These elements install appropriate state and forward the PA...