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Privacy Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in IPv6 (RFC3041)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005235D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Aug-20
Document File: 18 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

T. Narten: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Nodes use IPv6 stateless address autoconfiguration to generate addresses without the necessity of a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server. Addresses are formed by combining network prefixes with an interface identifier. On interfaces that contain embedded IEEE Identifiers, the interface identifier is typically derived from it. On other interface types, the interface identifier is generated through other means, for example, via random number generation. This document describes an extension to IPv6 stateless address autoconfiguration for interfaces whose interface identifier is derived from an IEEE identifier. Use of the extension causes nodes to generate global-scope addresses from interface identifiers that change over time, even in cases where the interface contains an embedded IEEE identifier. Changing the interface identifier (and the global-scope addresses generated from it) over time makes it more difficult for eavesdroppers and other information collectors to identify when different addresses used in different transactions actually correspond to the same node.

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Network Working Group T. Narten Request for Comments: 3041 IBM Category: Standards Track R. Draves Microsoft Research

January 2001

Privacy Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in IPv6

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

Nodes use IPv6 stateless address autoconfiguration to generate addresses without the necessity of a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server. Addresses are formed by combining network prefixes with an interface identifier. On interfaces that contain embedded IEEE Identifiers, the interface identifier is typically derived from it. On other interface types, the interface identifier is generated through other means, for example, via random number generation. This document describes an extension to IPv6 stateless address autoconfiguration for interfaces whose interface identifier is derived from an IEEE identifier. Use of the extension causes nodes to generate global-scope addresses from interface identifiers that change over time, even in cases where the interface contains an embedded IEEE identifier. Changing the interface identifier (and the global-scope addresses generated from it) over time makes it more difficult for eavesdroppers and other information collectors to identify when different addresses used in different transactions actually correspond to the same node.

Narten Draves Standards Track [Page 1]

RFC 3041 Extensions to IPv6 Address Autoconfiguration January 2001

Table of Contents

1. Introduction............................................. 2 2. Background............................................... 3 2.1. Extended Use of the Same Identifier................. 3 2.2. Address Usage in IPv4 Today......................... 4 2.3. The Concern With IPv6 Addresses..................... 5

2.4. Possible Approaches................................. 6 3. Protocol Description..................................... 7 3.1. Assumptions......................................... 8 3.2. Generation Of Randomized Interface Identifiers...... 9 3.3. Generating Temporary Addresses...................... 10 3.4. Expiration of Temporary Addresses................... 11

3.5. Regeneration of Randomized Interface Identifiers.... 12 4. Implications of Changing Interface Identifiers........... 13 5. Defined Constants........................................ 14 6. Future Work.............................................. 14 7. Security Considerations.................................. 15 8. Acknowledgments..........