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Reliable Multicast Transport Building Blocks for One-to-Many Bulk-Data Transfer (RFC3048)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005242D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Aug-20
Document File: 21 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

B. Whetten: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

This document describes a framework for the standardization of bulk- data reliable multicast transport. It builds upon the experience gained during the deployment of several classes of contemporary reliable multicast transport, and attempts to pull out the commonalities between these classes of protocols into a number of building blocks. To that end, this document recommends that certain components that are common to multiple protocol classes be standardized as "building blocks". The remaining parts of the protocols, consisting of highly protocol specific, tightly intertwined functions, shall be designated as "protocol cores". Thus, each protocol can then be constructed by merging a "protocol core" with a number of "building blocks" which can be re-used across multiple protocols.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 7% of the total text.

Network Working Group B. Whetten Request for Comments: 3048 Talarian Category: Informational L. Vicisano

Cisco R. Kermode

Motorola M. Handley

ACIRI 9 S. Floyd

ACIRI

M. Luby Digital Fountain

January 2001

Reliable Multicast Transport Building Blocks for One-to-Many

Bulk-Data Transfer

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document describes a framework for the standardization of bulk- data reliable multicast transport. It builds upon the experience gained during the deployment of several classes of contemporary reliable multicast transport, and attempts to pull out the commonalities between these classes of protocols into a number of building blocks. To that end, this document recommends that certain components that are common to multiple protocol classes be standardized as "building blocks". The remaining parts of the protocols, consisting of highly protocol specific, tightly intertwined functions, shall be designated as "protocol cores". Thus, each protocol can then be constructed by merging a "protocol core" with a number of "building blocks" which can be re-used across multiple protocols.

Whetten, et al. Informational [Page 1]

RFC 3048 RMT Building Blocks January 2001

Table of Contents

1 Introduction .................................................. 2 1.1 Protocol Families ........................................... 5 2 Building Blocks Rationale ..................................... 6 2.1 Building Blocks Advantages .................................. 6 2.2 Building Block Risks ........................................ 7 2.3 Building Block Requirements ................................. 8 3 Protocol Components ........................................... 8 3.1 Sub-Components Definition ................................... 9 4 Building Block Recommendations ................................ 12 4.1 NACK-based Reliability ...................................... 13 4.2 FEC coding .................................................. 13 4.3 Congestion Control .......................................... 13 4.4 Generic Router Support ...................................... 14 4.5 Tree Configuration .......................................... 14 4.6 Data Security ............................................... 15 4.7 Common Headers .............................................. 15 4.8 Protocol Cores .............................................. 15 5 Security ...................................................... 15 6 IANA Considerations ........................................... 15 7 Conclusions ................................................... 16 8 Acknowledgements .............................................. 16 9 References .................................................... 16 10 Authors' Addresses ........................................... 19 11 ...