Dismiss
IP.com applications will be updated on Sunday, March 5, from 11 am to 2 pm ET, to add new functionality and content. You may experience brief service interruptions during this period. We apologize for any inconvenience.
Browse Prior Art Database

End-to-end Performance Implications of Slow Links (RFC3150)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005332D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Aug-21
Document File: 18 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

S. Dawkins: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This document makes performance-related recommendations for users of network paths that traverse "very low bit-rate" links.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 8% of the total text.

Network Working Group S. Dawkins Request for Comments: 3150 G. Montenegro BCP: 48 M . Kojo Category: Best Current Practice V. Magret

July 2001

End-to-end Performance Implications of Slow Links

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document makes performance-related recommendations for users of network paths that traverse "very low bit-rate" links.

"Very low bit-rate" implies "slower than we would like". This recommendation may be useful in any network where hosts can saturate available bandwidth, but the design space for this recommendation explicitly includes connections that traverse 56 Kb/second modem links or 4.8 Kb/second wireless access links both of which are widely deployed.

This document discusses general-purpose mechanisms. Where application-specific mechanisms can outperform the relevant general- purpose mechanism, we point this out and explain why.

This document has some recommendations in common with RFC 2689, "Providing integrated services over low-bitrate links", especially in areas like header compression. This document focuses more on traditional data applications for which "best-effort delivery" is appropriate.

Dawkins, et al. Best Current Practice [Page 1]

RFC 3150 PILC Slow Links July 2001

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction ................................................. 2 2.0 Description of Optimizations ................................. 3 2.1 Header Compression Alternatives ...................... 3 2.2 Payload Compression Alternatives ..................... 5 2.3 Choosing MTU sizes ................................... 5 2.4 Interactions with TCP Congestion Control [RFC2581] ... 6 2.5 TCP Buffer Auto-tuning ............................... 9

2.6 Small Window Effects ................................. 10 3.0 Summary of Recommended Optimizations ......................... 10 4.0 Topics For Further Work ...................................... 12 5.0 Security Considerations ...................................... 12 6.0 IANA Considerations .......................................... 13 7.0 Acknowledgements ............................................. 13 8.0 References ................................................... 13 Authors' Addresses ............................................... 16 Full Copyright Statement ......................................... 17

1.0 Introduction

The Internet protocol stack was designed to operate in a wide range of link speeds, and has met this design goal with only a limited number of enhancements (for example, the use of TCP window scaling as described in "TCP Extensions for High Performance" [RFC1323] for very-high-bandwidth connections).

Pre-World Wide Web application protocols tended to be either interactive applications sending very little data (e.g., Telnet) ...