Browse Prior Art Database

MONOLITHIC CLOCK OSCILLATOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005413D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Oct-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Stan Polinski: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A basic problem in crystal controlled oscillators is the crystal mount itself. The crystal blank must be mechanically supported and electrically connected to the circuit without the mount having any affect on it. Unfortunately, it does. A method is described where the oscillator board is also a crystal resonator, thus the entire crystal mount and its associated problems are eliminated.

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MOTOROLA Technical Disclosure Bulletin Vol. 1 No. 1 August 1980

MONOLITHIC CLOCK OSCILLATOR By Stan Polinski and Don Vineis

ABSTRACT

  A basic problem in crystal controlled oscillators is the crystal mount itself. The crystal blank must be mechanically supported and electrically connected to the circuit without the mount having any affect on it. Unfortunately, it does. A method is described where the oscillator board is also a crystal resonator, thus the entire crystal mount and its associated problems are eliminated.

INTRODUCTION

   Several methods of mechanical mounting and their effects on crystal performance were evaluated. The mount problem can be at best minimized. The main reason seems to be a materials incompatibility of quartz vs metal. A completely compatible system would consist of a single material - quartz. A part of a quartz oscillator board is configured to act as a resonator with metallized electrodes on either side. With the material supporting the resonator also being quartz, mechanical incompatibility is thereby eliminated.

DESCRIPTION OFTHE PROCESS

   Using thin film technology such as, vacuum deposition to deposit a combined layer of metalization consisting of conductors for an integrated circuit and crystal electrodes now can be achieved in one process. All metalization is evaporated simultaneously onto a quartz substrate that has been pre-sized and ultrasonically drilled for mounting on a metal base (Figure 1). The thickness of the quartz substrate...