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Method for rack-level air ducts integral to front and rear access doors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005459D
Publication Date: 2001-Oct-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 115K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for rack-level air ducts that are integral to front and rear access doors. Benefits include improved cooling of rack-mounted electronic equipment.

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19492

Method for rack-level air ducts integral to front and rear access doors

Disclosed is a method for rack-level air ducts that are integral to front and rear access doors. Benefits include improved cooling of rack-mounted electronic equipment.

Description

              The disclosed method includes the installation of an air duct at the inlet and outlet to a mounting rack to enhance cooling (see Figure 1). These ducts also serve as access doors to the front and rear of the electronics rack components, such as servers, switches, and power supplies (see Figure 2). 

              Data centers are constructed so that cold air comes from floor vents and hot air exits through ceiling ducts. The front access door provides airflow to the electronic components without cooling the rest of the room unnecessarily. Similarly, the rear duct directs the hot air to the ceiling for return to the air conditioning (A/C) unit.

Advantages

              Conventionally, cold air from the floor is allowed to mix with warmer air in the room before being taken into the rack components (see Figure 3). Similarly, hot air on the exit side is allowed to mix with colder air in the room (see Figure 4).

      The disclosed method enables cold air to reach electronic rack components (servers and switches) without mixing with warmer air. The result is improved component cooling.

Fig. 1

Fig. 2

Fig. 3

Fig. 4

Disclosed anonymously

19492