Browse Prior Art Database

DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LOOP SYNCHRONIZATION TECHNIQUE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005485D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Oct-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 97K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Richard A. Comroe: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The integrated services digital network (ISON) will permit new and diverse communication for the information society. The fundamental element of any ISON system is an end-to-end digital communica- tions capability. This end-to-end digital capability also presents the greatest technical challenge when attempts are made to utilize already existing subscriber loops designed for voice band audio. These metallic loops are commonly called digital subscriber loops (DSL) for this application.

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,:A" MOTOROLA Technlcal Developments
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Volume 3 March 1983

DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LOOP SYNCHRONIZATION TECHNIQUE

By Richard A. Comroe and David E. Borth

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

    The integrated services digital network (ISON) will permit new and diverse communication for the information society. The fundamental element of any ISON system is an end-to-end digital communica- tions capability. This end-to-end digital capability also presents the greatest technical challenge when attempts are made to utilize already existing subscriber loops designed for voice band audio. These metallic loops are commonly called digital subscriber loops (DSL) for this application.

   A common DSL technique which alternately uses the line for transmission of data in each direction is called time compression multiplexing (TCM) or ping-pong. Implementations vary between systems in such details as modulation or line code, bit rate, and burst rate. Motorola, for example, has announced
a chip set which uses a unique line code called modified differential phase shift keying (MDPSK) to transmit 80 Kbls data bidirectionally at a 256 Kbls burst rate.1

   The design of a reliable receiver for the reception of TCM transmissions over OSLs requires a significant design effort. Because of the nature of TCM transmission, most existing receiver tech- niques are not directy applicable. For example, because data is sent in bursts, bit and frame syn- chronization must be established prior to data demodulation. Most discontinuous transmission schemes make use of synchronization bits at the start of each burst to assist synchronization. However, in a TCM system, extra bits used for synchronization result in a reduction of bit rate and/or

line length and are thus to be avoided, if possible.

SOLUTION

    The characteristics of the MDPSK line code in aTCM system can be exploited by a receiver to pro- vide reliable performance without the use of extra bits for synchronization. For example, independent of the transmitted data pattern, the MDPSK waveform has a zero crossing in the center of each bit dur- ing...