Browse Prior Art Database

Method for the scalable visualization of Web site statistics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005514D
Publication Date: 2001-Oct-10
Document File: 4 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for the scalable visualization of Web site statistics. Benefits include an improved concise, scalable graphical method of conveying data about Web sites for site management.

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Method for the scalable visualization of Web site statistics

Disclosed is a method for the scalable visualization of Web site statistics. Benefits include an improved concise, scalable graphical method of conveying data about Web sites for site management.  

Background

              The disclosed method is based on a well‐known visualization paradigm known as Chernoff faces. In 1973, Herman Chernoff proposed a method for displaying a multidimensional data set in a two dimensional picture resembling a human face (see Figure 1). ("The use of faces to represent points in k‐dimensional space graphically", Journal of the American Statistical Association, 68:361‐367.)

              The original paper on this topic defined a set of 18 facial characteristics that could be varied according to the values of normalized data points assigned to each one. A final revised version of the paper defined 20 possible parameters, including:

·        Face width

·        Ear level

·        Half‐face height

·        Eccentricity of upper ellipse of face

·        Eccentricity of lower ellipse of face

·        Length of nose

·        Position of center of mouth

·        Curvature of mouth

·        Length of mouth

·        Height of center of eyes

·        Separation of eyes

·        Slant of eyes

·        Eccentricity of eyes

·        Half length of eye

·        Position of pupil

·        Height of eyebrow

·        Angle of brow

·        Length of brow

·        Radius of ear

·        Nose width

              Chernoff's goal in inventing faces was to render a large number of data points in a compact space, to facilitate quick high‐level comparisons between n‐dimensional objects. The concept of faces was chosen to take advantage of people’s innate ability to distinguish variations in facial features. The disclosed method applies the technique of faces visualization to problems in Web site management.

              A Web site includes a collection of viewable pages, for example, .htm/.html, .asp, or .php files. Each file type has a series of parameters associated with it that are important to the management of the overall site, such as file size, link count, and hit count. The disclosed method models each page of the site as one multidimensional data set, one face. Other site elements, such as graphic files, audio/video clips, or embedded objects, can also be modeled as their own data sets but, for simplicity, all managed elements are referred to as pages.

              A Webmaster working with a typical static HTML file, for example, is interested in at least the following 8‐dimensional data set. All of these parameters can be collected from the Web server log file, the operating system, or a parse of the HTML.

·        File size

·        Number of links to internal pages

·        Number of links to external pages

·        Number of images

·        Total size of images

·        File age since creation

·        File age since last modification

·        Number of hits received over time period T

              Conventional techniques for reporting/analyzing Web site statistics organize data in two or sometimes three dimensions. A person typically uses a spreadsheet program to display parameters, such file size, age, and view totals, for each page (o...