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Browse Prior Art Database

Location Operating System (LOS)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005605D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Oct-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Oct-18
Document File: 7 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

David D. Heiderscheit: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This paper discusses the evolution of location and its impact on operating systems. We discuss the feasibility and issues associated with providing an enhanced Operating System (OS) by including additional features to support location services in order to describe the concept of a Location Operating System (LOS). We explain the basic LOS concept and provide a hierarchical software structure diagram of a LOS in a typical computer or embedded system environment. Further definition is provided on key elements of a LOS such as local synchronization, location task scheduler, location priority scheduling and location Input / Output. We have included some simple examples of this concept and describe key features such that one can easily see and understand the power of this concept. Finally, we define the set of features that would be elements of the LOS. As the demand for location services grows, this powerful concept will be a key element of the OSs of the future.

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Location Operating System (LOS)

David D. Heiderscheit

Jim E. Malone

Tsung Sheng

Abstract

This paper discusses the evolution of location and its impact on operating systems. We discuss the feasibility and issues associated with providing an enhanced Operating System (OS) by including additional features to support location services in order to describe the concept of a Location Operating System (LOS).  We explain the basic LOS concept and provide a hierarchical software structure diagram of a LOS in a typical computer or embedded system environment. Further definition is provided on key elements of a LOS such as local synchronization, location task scheduler, location priority scheduling and location Input / Output. We have included some simple examples of this concept and describe key features such that one can easily see and understand the power of this concept. Finally, we define the set of features that would be elements of the LOS.  As the demand for location services grows, this powerful concept will be a key element of the OS’s of the future.

 


Location Operating System (LOS)

The Location Operating System (LOS) controls all the location system resources (e.g., interface to positioning device hardware, location events, location task scheduler, allocation of storage based on location, location file system, and all legacy system capabilities) and provides a base upon which location applications can be built upon.

The following is an illustration of the Location Operating System (LOS) in a typical computer or embedded system environment.

Applications & Services

(e.g., Databases, Directories, Web Servers,  etc.)

 

Application Programs

(e.g., Java, C/C++ Applications, Scripts, etc.)

 

Compilers

&

Debuggers

Editors

&

Script Engines

 

Command

Interpreters

&

Virtual Machines

 

System Programs & Virtual Machines

(e.g. VRTx (RTOS) NT, Unix, Java, ASP, IIS, CGI, etc)

 

 

Location Operating System

·          Location Synchronization

·          Location Task Scheduler

·          Location Priority Scheduling

·          Location Input / Output

·          Location Storage Allocation

·          Location File System

·          Location Backup

 

Machine Language

 

Hardware Programs

(e.g., Display Device, Data Bus, I/O Memory, etc)

 

 

Micro-programming

 

Devices

(e.g., GPS modules, Displays, etc)

 

       

The Location Operating System (LOS) is designed to control specific location data-processing systems in order to allow users and application programmers to synchronize and schedule location tasks, allocate storage based on location, manage a location file system, perform location process swapping, and perform other services. In addition, the system can present a default interface to the user to configure items such as; synchronization parameters, schedule location tasks and to manage a location file system.  The primary role of the Location Operating System (LOS) is to provide for an orderly and controlled allocation of local and remote resources (e.g., processes, memories, and I/O) among location programs competing for resources related to the location...