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Method for self-marking floors, walls, ceilings, and similar facility components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005649D
Publication Date: 2001-Oct-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 1K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for self-marking floors, walls, ceilings, and similar facility components. Benefits include improved safety.

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Method for self-marking floors, walls, ceilings, and similar facility components

Disclosed is a method for self-marking floors, walls, ceilings, and similar facility components. Benefits include improved safety.

General description

              Floors, walls, ceiling, and similar facility components are manufactured with high-visibility colors and designs on surfaces that are not visible when the items are installed or secured become visible when disassembled or unsecured. In manufacturing facilities and other locations where potentially hazardous equipment or conditions exist, a safety hazard may be created when an item is opened, removed, or unsecured. Safety hazards may cause injury to personnel in the area. For example, a person could fall through an opening in a raised floor. A visible self-marking design in the floor would help workers to detect the change in the floor pattern and prevent them from falling into the opening. A change in the color or pattern on the reverse side of the tile can also help to prevent it from being a tripping hazard. The disclosed method can also be adapted to manholes/covers, electrical panels, screws/screw holes, ceiling tiles, and other facility components.

              Conventional procedures require good discipline on the part of workers. For example, when floor tiles are removed, barricades are supposed to be erected around the opening to prevent personnel from accidentally falling into the opening. However, the procedures are not always fully implemented. When floor openings are left unmarked, people fall through these floor openings on occasion and sometimes sustain injuries. If the screws that normally secure the tiles are not in place, a tile may become loose and result in someone falling through the floor. The self-marking floor automatically marks screws and screw holes, a floor opening, and a removed tile, greatly reducing the possibility of injuri...