Browse Prior Art Database

LCD VIEWING ANGLE ADJUSTMENT FOR AUTOMOTIVE INSTRUMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005681D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Oct-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Joseph Francis Robin, Jr.: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention relates to a front panel (dashboard) automotive electronic instrument having a liquid crystal type display, a microprocessor control module, and a limited number(3 or less) of front panel pushbutton switches accessible to thevehicle user. In addition, anon-volatile memory, as part of the module, isdesirable. This inven- tion makes use of the known fact that changing the backplane voltage of a liquid crystal display will cause the optimum viewing angle to change.

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MO7VROLA Technical Developments Volume 7 October 1987

LCD VIEWING ANGLE ADJUSTMENT FOR AUTOMOTIVE INSTRUMENT

by Joseph Francis Robin, Jr.

   This invention relates to a front panel (dashboard) automotive electronic instrument having a liquid crystal type display, a microprocessor control module, and a limited number(3 or less) of front panel pushbutton switches accessible to thevehicle user. In addition, anon-volatile memory, as part of the module, isdesirable. This inven- tion makes use of the known fact that changing the backplane voltage of a liquid crystal display will cause the optimum viewing angle to change.

Using a simple easy-to-learn algorithm, the instrument (vehicle) user is allowed to vary the viewing angle by the following mechanisms:

a) A sequence of events, such as pushbutton actuations, causes an instrument control module to go into a Viewing Angle Set Mode.

b) Depression of one or two front panel pushbuttons then causes the microprocessor to alter appropriate data in a memory, preferably non-volatile.

c) This data is processed by a circuit which causes a corresponding voltage to be applied to the LCD backplane.

   Thus we have closed loop control of the optimum viewing angle. The loop is closed by the operator's eyes telling his finger, via his brain, that an optimum viewing angle or an optimum contrast has been achieved. This new technique only requires a very limited number of pushbuttons which are already present for normal instru- ment control ope...