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UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE MAPPING FOR SMALL ALPHANUMERIC DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005707D
Original Publication Date: 1988-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Oct-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Tim Laflin: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The international market for alphanumerics has developed a need for special national character sets. The problem in having each country define their own character set is that there is no set standard. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has been working to unify the various countries to agree on a standard character set. The character set that was agreed upon was the standard ASCII mapping with the values of 23, 24, 40, 58, 5C, 5D, 5E, 60, 78, 7C, 7D, 7E as alternate locations (refer to table 1). These alternate locations in the ASCII table are to allow each country to insert their own special characters. The special characters are characters that are unique to the country. Table 2 contains all the special characters for the countries that desire their own mappings.

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m MOlYlROLA Technical Developments Volume 8 October 1988

UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE MAPPING FOR SMALL ALPHANUMERIC DEVICES

by Tim Laflin and Mark Stair

   The international market for alphanumerics has developed a need for special national character sets. The problem in having each country define their own character set is that there is no set standard. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has been working to unify the various countries to agree on a standard character set. The character set that was agreed upon was the standard ASCII mapping with the values of 23, 24, 40, 58, 5C, 5D, 5E, 60, 78, 7C, 7D, 7E as alternate locations (refer to table 1). These alternate locations in the ASCII table are to allow each country to insert their own special characters. The special characters are characters that are unique to the country. Table 2 contains all the special characters for the countries that desire their own mappings.

   The problem with all the different character sets is that small hand held alphanumeric devices are mostly ROM based. It is undesirable to have adifferent ROM pattern for each country and masking all languages into one ROM required a large amount of program space. Another problem with masking characters into a ROM is that having a country redefine a character mapping or create a new character could make a very expensive ROM mask obsolete.

   The solution to the problem is to use a small EEPROM device to contain the special characters for each country. Each time an alternate character's value is received by the pager, the pager will access the EEPROM to see which character will be displayed. This method also allows the different countries to create unique characters not defined in the character generator ROM. A pixel pattern of s...