Browse Prior Art Database

AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING EQUIPMENT REPORTING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005708D
Original Publication Date: 1988-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Oct-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 106K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Roger P. Stout: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

One of the fundamental goals in factory automation is a utilization of equipment which is capable of operating unattended over extended periods of time. Utilizing MTBA (Mean Time Between Assists) and MTTR (Mean Time To Repair) equipment can be sufficiently characterized to be able to predict whether it can be suc- cessfully integrated into an automated factory.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 0 October 1988

AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING EQUIPMENT REPORTING

by Roger I? Stout and Stephen H. George

   One of the fundamental goals in factory automation is a utilization of equipment which is capable of operating unattended over extended periods of time. Utilizing MTBA (Mean Time Between Assists) and MTTR (Mean Time To Repair) equipment can be sufficiently characterized to be able to predict whether it can be suc- cessfully integrated into an automated factory.

   To measure the MTBA and MTTA of a piece of equipment, an IBM PC based real-time data collection system entitled ERP(Equipment Reporting Program), was developed.The ERPsystem was based upon two fundamen- tal premises. First, that the system must have the ability to disable the equipment when an assist is required. Second, the operator interface should be brief, smooth, and quick. An example of the ERP system architecture is shown in the accompanying diagram.

   The disable requirement can be accommodated if the'equipment being monitored utiliT.es SEC.'%, the Semiconductor Equipment and Materials Institute's standard message set (Equipment Type 1). This will pro- vide ERP with the minimal input requirements to monitor the system. If the equipment is not provided with SECS-II, a ulA (Micro Interface Adaptor) is utilized (Equipment Type 3).

   The ulA provides a consistent control and data gathering interface with classes of equipment that do not support SECS-I or SECS-II. The ulA not only adapts systems that were not capable of interfacing with the ERP system; but also provides a consistent message set. The ulA consists of a single board computer (MC68HCll), 16K ROM, 8K RAM, asynchronous communications interface adapter (MC6850 ACIA), and a port replacement unit (MC68HC24 PRU). These components are packaged in a single enclosure which forms a "black box" inter- face with a specific piece of equipment. The inputs to the ulA are digital signals and/or serial data from the equipment. The inputs allow the uIA to determine the producing state, machine errors, and number of units

produced. The ulA then reports this information using the SECS-II protocol. The ulA may also respond to in- quiries made by the host. The only control...