Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

ALPHA MESSAGE ENTRY USING A NUMERIC TELEPHONE KEY PAD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005759D
Original Publication Date: 1988-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Michael J. DeLuca: AUTHOR

Abstract

With the advent of paging receivers capable of receiving alpha messages the ability to enter alpha messages from a simple telephone key pad is desirable. Several techniques have been described in the past. One tech- nique includes requiring acaller to carry acard with numbers representing a limited vocabulary of words. Another technique requires a caller to carry a portable electronic device capable of electronically communicating alpha characters over a phone line. Still another technique does not require the caller to carry extra cards or elec- tronic devices, but require the caller to push multiple telephone keys to enter one letter. Entire messages can be entered this way but the message must be entered one letter at a time, with an average of two key strokes per letter. It is an object of this invention to provide a means for entering alpha messages from a telephone key pad without requiring extracards orelectronic devices while substantially reducing the numberof telephone key presses.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

M-ROLA Technical Developments Volume 8 October 1988

ALPHA MESSAGE ENTRY USING A NUMERIC TELEPHONE KEY PAD

                          by Michael J. DeLuca With the advent of paging receivers capable of receiving alpha messages the ability to enter alpha messages from a simple telephone key pad is desirable. Several techniques have been described in the past. One tech- nique includes requiring acaller to carry acard with numbers representing a limited vocabulary of words. Another technique requires a caller to carry a portable electronic device capable of electronically communicating alpha characters over a phone line. Still another technique does not require the caller to carry extra cards or elec- tronic devices, but require the caller to push multiple telephone keys to enter one letter. Entire messages can be entered this way but the message must be entered one letter at a time, with an average of two key strokes per letter. It is an object of this invention to provide a means for entering alpha messages from a telephone key pad without requiring extracards orelectronic devices while substantially reducing the numberof telephone key presses.

   The apparatus consists of a DTMF decoder, a sequence generator coupled to a dictionary, and a feedback means coupled to a paging system. These elements are well within the means of modern personal computer technology. The callerenters one word at a time from a telephone key pad, one digit corresponding to one letter wherein the letter corresponds to one of the three letters printed on the telephone key. After the word is entered, the sequence generator generates all of the possible combinations of words from the numbers entered. The dictionary then tests the words generated by the sequence generator for valid words in the language of the caller. The dictionary selects the most likely word to be used. The most likely word can be determined by establishing word frequency tables and then selecting the most frequently used word from the list, or by deter- mining sentence structure and selecting the most likely next word based on the previous words. After the most likely word is selected, the word is fed back to the sender. The feed back means can be realized by a synthesiz- ed voice feedback means. If the word is the desired word, the caller would press a "#" indicating correct. If incorrect, the caller would press a "*" indicating an incorrect selection. In response to an incorrec...