Browse Prior Art Database

EE-PROM MEMORY IN SYNTHESIZER/PLL TO STORE DEVIATION INFORMATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005805D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Steve Einbinder: AUTHOR

Abstract

In our present SABER radio the modulation deviation of the synthesizer is set through two digital attenuators. The method in which these attenuators are programmed is very inefficient. Each channel in the radio has adigital word associated with that frequency setting. The deviation must be measured and tuned for each channel then programmed into the EE-Prom. This is a tremendously time consuming process. We do have some improvement in our factory by having certain deviation forecast algorithms but these still require that several deviation measurements be made on each radio. This data is saved with the particular radio and synthesizer and then used to calculate the attentuator settings for any given channel. These algorithms do not help in the field where there are no BIG-FOOT autotest systems. This process must be performed on every radio or every time a syn- thesizer is replaced.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 80% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

MOlYlROLA Technical Developments Volume 9 August 1989

EE-PROM MEMORY IN SYNTHESIZEWPLL TO STORE DEVIATION INFORMATION

by Steve Einbinder

   In our present SABER radio the modulation deviation of the synthesizer is set through two digital attenuators. The method in which these attenuators are programmed is very inefficient. Each channel in the radio has adigital word associated with that frequency setting. The deviation must be measured and tuned for each channel then programmed into the EE-Prom. This is a tremendously time consuming process. We do have some improvement in our factory by having certain deviation forecast algorithms but these still require that several deviation measurements be made on each radio. This data is saved with the particular radio and synthesizer and then used to calculate the attentuator settings for any given channel. These algorithms do not help in the field where there are no BIG-FOOT autotest systems. This process must be performed on every radio or every time a syn- thesizer is replaced.

   An improved approach is to some how save the deviation data in the synthesizer. This deviation datacould be saved in a memory location within the module at synthesizer final test since it is measured at this point anyway. Now when a synthesizer is placed in the radio, the microprocessor can read the information and com- pute the attenuator settings. The result can be programmed into the attenuator. The radio has essentially tuned itself up. Thus an en...