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SILENT MODE ALERT FUNCTION RECOGNITION VIA MODULATION OF PULSATING VIBRATIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005879D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-13
Document File: 1 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Edward L. Ehmke: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Mechanical vibrations are commonly used as silent alert means in pagers. Most of the existing art electrical vibrators used in pagers are driven to produce uninterrupted vibrations. This serves the purpose of alerting the user that a message has been received, but the user must then observe a display or listen to audible alerts to determine the source of the message. The utilization of the modulation of a wntinuous vibrator for energy conservation purposes has been previously disclosed.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 10 March 1990

SILENT MODE ALERT FUNCTION RECOGNITION VIA MODULATION OF PULSATING VIBRATIONS

by Edward L. Ehmke, Tuan K. Nguyen, and Thomas J. Rollins

   Mechanical vibrations are commonly used as silent alert means in pagers. Most of the existing art electrical vibrators used in pagers are driven to produce uninterrupted vibrations. This serves the purpose of alerting the user that a message has been received, but the user must then observe a display or listen to audible alerts to determine the source of the message. The utilization of the modulation of a wntinuous vibrator for energy conservation purposes has been previously disclosed.

   The idea described in this article is to convey intelligence via encoded trains of pulsating vibrations. The user then is able to determine the source of the message received in a silent manner without the use of a display or irritating audible alerts. The total silent alert time in this embodiment is divided in alternating (ON/OFF) envelope cycles (8 iden- tical cycles for example). Each envelope cycle comprises an "ON" time (occupied by a number of distinct pulsating vibrations) and an "OFF" time (no vibration during a time much longer than the time that separates two consecutive pulsed vibrations of the same cycle). It is by varying the number of perceivably distinctive pulses in the active part of the cycle that one can convey information.

A direct application of the idea is the followin...