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WRIST WATCH PAGER WITH AQUEOUS ALERT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005892D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-14
Document File: 1 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Mike DeLuca: AUTHOR

Abstract

Audio alerts by watch pagers use a lot of power and in certain circumstances may not be heard by the user. An alternate approach to an audio alert is the use of water. Water is released to the wrist of the wearer in place of an alert. A pump pumps water from a reservoir for an alert. The reservoir may also serve as battery electrolite if the battery type is equivalent to that of the "Water Watch", The wrist worn device may comprise either a watch, a pager or a com- bination watch and pager, and the alert may be in response to either a page or a time of day alarm. This method of alerting has the additional advantage of generating an alert with potentially less battery energy than the current method of generating an audio alert or a vibrating alert, This is true because the sensation of the alert is generated by the sensation of cool water which is the result of evaporation. The evaporation is a natural process and does not require battery energy as does audio and vibrating alerts.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 10 March 1990

WRIST WATCH PAGER WITH AQUEOUS ALERT

by Mike DeLuca

   Audio alerts by watch pagers use a lot of power and in certain circumstances may not be heard by the user. An alternate approach to an audio alert is the use of water. Water is released to the wrist of the wearer in place of an alert. A pump pumps water from a reservoir for an alert. The reservoir may also serve as battery electrolite if the battery type is equivalent to that of the "Water Watch", The wrist worn device may comprise either a watch, a pager or a com- bination watch and pager, and the alert may be in response to either a page or a time of day alarm. This method of alerting has the additional advantage of generating an alert with potentially less battery energy than the current method of generating an audio alert or a vibrating alert, This is true because the sensation of the alert is generated by the sensation of cool water which is the result of evaporation. The evaporation is a natural process and does not require battery energy as does audio and vibrating alerts.

   The figure below shows the operation of the invention. When an alarm is generated, water from the water reservoir is deposited on the wrist of the wearer thereby alerting the wearer. The alert may be in response to either a page or a time of day alarm. The water may also serve as battery electrolite, wherein a low cell alert assures a constant supply of both electrolite and alert...