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GOLF CART TRACKING AND COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005983D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 175K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Morris Anthony Moore: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

For many people who enjoy golf, one of the biggest inhibitors is the excessive time it takes to play. One contributing factor to this time is the delay caused by slow play on busy courses. Many wurses have rangers who patrol the course to try and keep play moving. The systems described here seek to facilitate that process as well as provide communica- tions capability to golfers while on the course. Figure 1 is a block diagram of a system which addresses the issue of tracking golf carts while on the course.

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MO7VROLA Technical Developments Volume 11 October 1990

GOLF CART TRACKING AND COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

by Morris Anthony Moore and Clifford Wood

   For many people who enjoy golf, one of the biggest inhibitors is the excessive time it takes to play. One contributing factor to this time is the delay caused by slow play on busy courses. Many wurses have rangers who patrol the course to try and keep play moving. The systems described here seek to facilitate that process as well as provide communica- tions capability to golfers while on the course. Figure 1 is a block diagram of a system which addresses the issue of tracking golf carts while on the course.

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Figure 1 - Track System Overview

0 Motorola, Inc. 1990 79

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 11 October 1990

   Low power transmitters (Part 15 devices, perhaps) are mounted on each golf cart. Each is capable of sending a unique code identifying that cart. This transponder chirps its code intermittently while the cart has power supplied. Com- patible receivers are placed at various locations where the carts may be expected to congregate such as at tees, the starter shack, the restaurant, etc. These receivers have unique ID's as well, and are connected to a central controller via any suitable means. They communicate their ID's and the ID's of carts that are located within their coverage along with signal strength information associated with each received transponder ID. The central data base is updated upon arrival of a golfer for play with the names of the golfers who will be assigned a particular cart. The information from the remote receiver sites can then be used to determine location of golfers and/or carts simply by identifying which receiver has received the strongest signal from each site. Since holes are generally not played at random, by coupling past history into the algorithm, conditions which might cause confusion can be avoided. For example, the fact that a cart appears to be located closer to hole 12 than hole 10 might be overruled if the last location for the cart was hole
9. At the central controller location (which might be the clubhouse, pro-shop, or starter shack), a display of some form would indicate the general state of the cart traffic on the course and an entry device could be used to request location information on a specific cart or individual. This could be useful in case of an emergency to quickly reach a golfer with > a message.

   In the very near future, better communications capability can be provided. Telepoint systems such as the CT-2 system going into service in the U.K. and the DECT syste...