Browse Prior Art Database

IMPROVED VIBRATOR MOUNTING METHOD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000005985D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 144K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Brad Murray: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the communications industry, silent (e.g., vibratory) alert optons are commonly offered to the customer as an alternate method of indicating the receipt of a message. Thus, a vibration system must be added either in the factory, or in the field. This presents an obvious logistics problem of exactly how to install, remove, repair etc.. .the vibrational system.

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MOZYlROlA Technical Developments Volume 11 October 1990

IMPROVED VIBRATOR MOUNTING METHOD

by Brad Murray and Jeff King

   In the communications industry, silent (e.g., vibratory) alert optons are commonly offered to the customer as an alternate method of indicating the receipt of a message. Thus, a vibration system must be added either in the factory, or in the field. This presents an obvious logistics problem of exactly how to install, remove, repair etc.. .the vibrational system.

   Current methods of installing a vibrator motor into a pager after the pager has been assembled require the pager to be disassembled to expose the circuit board(s). After fitting the pager with a vibrator, the vibrator leads must be hand soldered to pads on the circuit board. Hand soldering can be time consuming and may damage the pager or vibrator depending upon the skill of the operator. In fact, after vibrator installation, the pager must be reassembled and tested to insure no damage has occurred. Another conventional vibrator installation method requires the use of special tools and parts to install the vibrator motor to an external point on the pager. This method increases the size of the pager and also creates unneeded parts after the installation has been completed. However, since all pager users do not want vibratory alerts, installing a vibrator motor in every pager during initial assembly would not be a cost effective solution. It would be advantageous to design a vibrator installation method requiring no disassembly of the pager, no soldering, no special tools and which would not increase the size of the pager.

   Figures 1-3 depict a vibrator cradle designed to capture a vibrator motor. This cradle also incorporates a solderless lead system that uses vibrator leads that are designed to make contact with pads on a printed circuit board. The vibrator cradle has a dovetail design that slides into a mounting base attached to the PCB. After sliding the cradle into the base, an electrical contact is established between the contacts on the cradle and the pads on the PCB. This mounting cradle can be installed in a pager through any convenient opening in the housing of the pager (i.e. battery door). According to this installation method, no disassembly of the pager is required and no soldering is needed to provide avibrator alert.

   Another cost effective method for addin...