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METHOD FOR SELECTIVE BACKLIGHTING AND ALERTING OF AN LCD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006005D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

John F. MacDonald: AUTHOR

Abstract

Since displays are becoming very small and compact, such as in pagers or watches for example, a method is need- ed to enhance their readability, particularly in a dimly lit area. This method suggests the use of a multicolor E.L. panel to illuminate different portions of a liquid crystal display, in different colors, to enhance its readability by drawing the eye's attention to its different portions.

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MO7DROLA Technical Developments Volume 11 October 1990

METHOD FOR SELECTIVE BACKLIGHTING AND ALERTING OF AN LCD

by John F. MacDonald

   Since displays are becoming very small and compact, such as in pagers or watches for example, a method is need- ed to enhance their readability, particularly in a dimly lit area. This method suggests the use of a multicolor E.L. panel to illuminate different portions of a liquid crystal display, in different colors, to enhance its readability by drawing the eye's attention to its different portions.

   The significance of this method is that any specific portion of the display backlighting could be illuminated or flashed, separately or together, to call attention to the user's eye without the use of expensive transducers, vibrators or the like. This method also eliminates the use of additional components by integrating these features into an already existing component. For example, on existing pagers and watches, these features require the use of additional expensive in- candescent lamps or LEDs.

   The use of different color backgrounds for different areas of the display helps the user interrogate his display at a glance by dividing it into portions where he can associate colors with functions. For example, a blue color could be used for backlighting the time, yellow could be used for enunciators, green for telephone messages, red or flashing red could be used for alert functions and so on.

   Using an E.L. panel to accomplish all these...