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Browse Prior Art Database

PAGING SYSTEM HAVING CUSTOM RING SIGNAL DETECTION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006027D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 160K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jose Gutman: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention relates in general to the field of devices capable of detecting a ring signal at the telephone interface, and more specifically to paging systems capable of automatic telephone ring signal detection.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 11 October 1990

PAGING SYSTEM HAVING CUSTOM RING SIGNAL DETECTION

by Jose Gutman

This invention relates in general to the field of devices capable of detecting a ring signal at the telephone interface, and more specifically to paging systems capable of automatic telephone ring signal detection.

   The most commonly available telephone interface (i.e., a conventional subscriber loop) normally presents a ring signal at the interface to initiate a call to a destination party. The ring signal typically comprises a nominal 20.0 Hz sinusoid with a duty cycle of approximately 2.0 seconds "ON" and 4.0 seconds "OFF". The ring signal normally actuates a bell mechanism in a conventional telephone to alert the destination party that an originating caller is initiating a call.

Conventional paging terminals are capable of automatically detecting the ring signal and answering the telephone to initiate a page request from a caller. Normally, the ring signal information is limited to detecting the page request.

   Once the paging terminal answers the telephone the caller may be prompted for additional information, such as a pager address and an optional message, which composes a page to a selective call receiver. The pager address information uniquely maps a message format (e.g., numeric display, alphanumeric display, voice, and tone only) to a selective call receiver on the paging system. The page request may be detected by the paging terminal using conven- tional DTMF tones and/or modem protocols. An individual seletiive call receiver may be capable of receiving more than one message format (e.g., numeric display, voice, and tone only). Therefore, several pager addresses may map to the same exemplary selective call receiver on the paging system. Each pager address would alert and present a message using one of the message formats at the selective call receiver.

   lb select a particular pager address on the selective call receiver, the caller must enter one of the valid pager ad- dresses mapped to the selective call receiver. Subsequently, the caller may be prompted for a message (e.g., a voice message or a display message).

   Unfortunately, the selection process adds a level of confusion to the page request entry process. Callers are not always familiar with all the pager addresses and message formats mapped to the selective call receiver. Consequently, an erroneous page request may be entered by the caller.

   Moreover, the page request entry process tends to be encumbered by the additional step of selecting a valid pager address mapped to a message format on the selective call receiver. The entry process optimally requires additional information after entering a pager address to select a particular message format for the selective call receiver. This in- creases the amount of time required to enter a page request and reduces overall paging system thmughput.

   Alternately, the paging system may map a unique pager add...