Browse Prior Art Database

PAGING SYSTEM HAVING USER PROGRAMMABLE ALERTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006028D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 211K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jose Gutman: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention relates in general to the field of paging systems, and more specifically to those paging systems with selective call receivers having programmable alerts, Selective call receivers (e.g., pagers) are such a part of our lives today that it is common for a selective call receiver to emit an audible alert in a group of people and have more than one person erroneously reach for their receiver with no message received. The confusion stems from a lack of unique audible alert choices available to the user of the selec- tive call receiver. Typically, the selective call receiver is configured by the manufacturer to emit a "standard" audible alert, as programmed at the factory. The 'standard" alert may be configured in hardware or in the read-only-memory (ROM) of a controller within the selective call receiver. Normally, four different "standard" alerts are mapped to four pager addresses for a selective call receiver. These four alerts are reused for similar selective call receivem within the paging system. Therefore, the choices for audible alerts are very limited as perceived by the customer and the probabil- ity that more than one person will confuse the audible alert for their own is relatively high.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 28% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

m

MOlVROLA Technical Developments Volume 11 October 1990

PAGING SYSTEM HAVING USER PROGRAMMABLE ALERTS

by Jose Gutman

This invention relates in general to the field of paging systems, and more specifically to those paging systems with selective call receivers having programmable alerts,

   Selective call receivers (e.g., pagers) are such a part of our lives today that it is common for a selective call receiver to emit an audible alert in a group of people and have more than one person erroneously reach for their receiver with no message received. The confusion stems from a lack of unique audible alert choices available to the user of the selec- tive call receiver. Typically, the selective call receiver is configured by the manufacturer to emit a "standard" audible alert, as programmed at the factory. The 'standard" alert may be configured in hardware or in the read-only-memory (ROM) of a controller within the selective call receiver. Normally, four different "standard" alerts are mapped to four pager addresses for a selective call receiver. These four alerts are reused for similar selective call receivem within the paging system. Therefore, the choices for audible alerts are very limited as perceived by the customer and the probabil- ity that more than one person will confuse the audible alert for their own is relatively high.

   Alternately, some conventional paging systems emit part of the transmitted pager address information from a speaker at the selective call receiver (e.g., a tone or warble tone) for the alert. These alerts are normally not programmable by the user of the selective call receiver. The alert choices are also somewhat limited. Finally, the contemporary paging systems that are constrained to sending out tones or warble tones for part of the pager address information may not be capable of sending the newer and more efficient digital communication (e.g., numeric display and/or alphanumeric display) message formats. Therefore, the alternate paging systems have limited alert choices and limited message formats.

   Hence, conventional paging systems provide limited audible alert choices and lack the ability for the user of the selective call receiver to program the alerts. Consequently, the problem of confusing audible alerts persists. Moreover, the situation is increasingly aggravated with the increasing number of selective call receivers in use today and the capacity to support large numbers of selective call receivers in contemporary paging systems.

   Referring to FIG. 1, a block diagram of a paging system capable of user programmable alerts is shown, in accor- dance with an embodiment of the present invention. A paging terminal normally accepts a page request from a telephone caller via a pulic switched telephone network (PSTN) and/or a private branch exchange (PSX) that couples to an automatic telephone input module at the paging terminal. Once the paging terminal answers the telephone the caller may be prompted for addit...