Browse Prior Art Database

MOTION SENSING BATTERY SAVER FOR PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006079D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Christopher R. Long: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a user-activated device which provides a simple method of turning a portable electronic device on and off without active controls, thereby also serving as a battery life enhancer. This device also eliminates the need for a user activated switch and eliminates the inherent reliability problems with user activated controls due to cycling, dust and water intrusion, or contamination.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 12 April 1991

MOTION SENSING BATTERY SAVER FOR PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

by Christopher R. Long and John K. Gleeson

  Disclosed is a user-activated device which provides a simple method of turning a portable electronic device on and off without active controls, thereby also serving as a battery life enhancer. This device also eliminates the need for a user activated switch and eliminates the inherent reliability problems with user activated controls due to cycling, dust and water intrusion, or contamination.

  The device utilizes a mass mounted on a spring wire to detect motion (figure 1). Motion is sensed by the movement of the mass originally at rest coming in contact with a conductive shell that also serves to protect the assembly. This contact to the outer shell generates a momentary switch closure that activates the microprocessor's power supply. The activation period is designed to debounce random motion inputs. This protects against the electronic device being

MOTION SENSING BATTERY SAVER FOR PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

accidentally turned on by a jarring or bump to the device. Upon activation, the microprocessor then sets a clock to a predetermined period of time. e.g., three minutes. This clock then counts down and turns the unit off when the time elapses unless it is reset by the motion sensor. The continual motion imparted to the unit by the wearer would continually reset the clock so that the unit would st...