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AUDIBLE MESSAGE ALERT WITH EAR PROXIMITY DETECTOR FOR PORTABLE HANDSETS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006101D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Dec-04
Document File: 5 page(s) / 218K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Robert Louis Breeden: AUTHOR

Abstract

Telecommunications systems which utilize portable handsets often must send internally generated messages, such as call-progress messages, to the handset user. Other audible call progress messages may be sent to the handset from sources outside the system. (Probably the most common one of these is the audible call progress message "Hello", sent by the called party when he answers!) These messages generally arrive during or shortly after the time that the handset user is operating the handset control keys or has just finished dialing a number. Because operation of the handset keys requires that the handset be moved away from the user's ear to a position where the handset can be viewed by the user, the user generally is unable to hear any audible messages during operation of the handset keys. For handsets which incorporate an alphanumeric display, there is usually no problem caused by the inability to hear internally generated audible messages, because a properly designed system simultaneously will send similar messages to the handset display, where they can be read by the user. Extra long or complicated internally generated messages, however, and'audible messages which come from outside the system generally cannot be duplicated adequately, if at all, on the handset display. Users with handsets which do not incorporate a display of course must receive all messages audibly.

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MO7VROLA INC. ' Technical Developments Volume 12 April 1991

AUDIBLE MESSAGE ALERT WITH EAR PROXIMITY DETECTOR FOR PORTABLe HANDSETS

by Robert Louis Breeden

  Telecommunications systems which utilize portable handsets often must send internally generated messages, such as call-progress messages, to the handset user. Other audible call progress messages may be sent to the handset from sources outside the system. (Probably the most common one of these is the audible call progress message "Hello", sent by the called party when he answers!) These messages generally arrive during or shortly after the time that the handset user is operating the handset control keys or has just finished dialing a number. Because operation of the handset keys requires that the handset be moved away from the user's ear to a position where the handset can be viewed by the user, the user generally is unable to hear any audible messages during operation of the handset keys. For handsets which incorporate an alphanumeric display, there is usually no problem caused by the inability to hear internally generated audible messages, because a properly designed system simultaneously will send similar messages to the handset display, where they can be read by the user. Extra long or complicated internally generated messages, however, and'audible messages which come from outside the system generally cannot be duplicated adequately, if at all, on the handset display. Users with handsets which do not incorporate a display of course must receive all messages audibly.

  If the handset user is sufficiently familiar with the general operation and timing of the system, the user may be aware of when to listen for audible messages and may move the handset to ear position in order to hear them. Many less sophisticated users, however, will miss important audible messages due to the handset's being positioned away from the ear, and may become confused about the progress of their calls. What is needed is a means of alerting the handset user that an audible-only message is about to arrive, so that the user can then move the handset to ear position to be able to hear it. Delaying the start of each internally generated audible message for a second or two after

the alert (to allow for handset repositioning) would help, too. A further desirable enhancement would be a means for the handset automatically to tell the system when it has been repositiyned to the user's ear, so that the system can then send any internally generated audible messages immediately.

  One solution is an algorithm by which a Controlling Part of a com+nication system (such as a CT-2 base station) can !send control codes to the handset to generate an "Audible Message Alert" to inform the handset user that an audible message, not to be duplicated on the hindset display (if present), is about to arrive. The Audible Message Alert can take the form of a brief distinctive pattern of moderately loud "beeps" from the handset r...