Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

SITE SHARED WIDE AREA TRUNKED NETWORK

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006201D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Dec-13
Document File: 2 page(s) / 133K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Gary Grube: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention is related to trunked radio systems that provide communications over a wide geographic area. In particular it will consider the case where two or more of these wide area systems have at least one geographic area of desired service provision in com- mon. Many times these radio systems are privately owned by governmental bodies or by larger industrial users such as utility companies and the like. Private ownership, as opposed to commercial shared system access, is desired in many cases where the users demand full radio system control, desire rapid imple- mentation of new features, and when they must always be guaranteed that "their" channels (system resources) are always available to them. This invention will address these touchy private user issues while allow- ing them some of the economic benefits of the shared systems approach.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 45% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

0 M

MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 13 July 1991

SITE SHARED WIDE AREA TRUNKED NETWORK

By Gary Grube

  This invention is related to trunked radio systems that provide communications over a wide geographic area. In particular it will consider the case where two or more of these wide area systems have at least one geographic area of desired service provision in com- mon. Many times these radio systems are privately owned by governmental bodies or by larger industrial users such as utility companies and the like. Private ownership, as opposed to commercial shared system access, is desired in many cases where the users demand full radio system control, desire rapid imple- mentation of new features, and when they must always be guaranteed that "their" channels (system resources) are always available to them. This invention will address these touchy private user issues while allow- ing them some of the economic benefits of the shared systems approach.

  This invention is a method to combine what used to be two or more independent sets of repeaters into one set with one control channel and a series of voice channel resources that may be shared by two or more wide area networks. These two or more networks each have various user groups. One control channel will receive resource requests from all groups and make resource assignments to them. Figure 1 shows the new arrangement.

  A resource controller is used by each network to handle the call requests from its units. The shared site control channel will funnel the Inbound Signalling Word (ISW) requests, from the field communication unit-to-fixed end inbound path, to each controller. Each resource controller has strict control over the channels at its non-shared sites (i.e. site Al for con- troller A or Bl for controller B), and shared control over the pooled channels at the shared site. The chan- nels at the shared site are pooled to be used and assigned by either controller. The Outbound Sig- nailing Word (OSW) assignments, from each con- troller, targeted for the field communications units, are broadcast by the single shared control channel. A pre-

0 Motorola. 1°C. 19%

arrangement will determine how many channels each controller can simultaneously assign, that is, channels are "owned" by at least one of the controllers. Con- troller A can allocate nAchannels while controller B is allowed to assign ng channels. Note that a shared site with m channels means that nA + ng = m.

  When a given resource controller receives a resource request that requires a channel at its non- shared site, it simply picks any one that is available. When the call requires a channel at the shared region site it will look at how many channels it currently has assigned there within its allotment. If one of its chan- nels is available, it simply assigns it. If not, it can either queue the request for consideration later, or it can request to borrow a channel from the other con- troller. The other controller will...