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SELF-FORMING, NON-RESIDUE TEMPORARY GASKET FOR LEAK SEALING 3-D SURFACES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006225D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Dec-14
Document File: 2 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

John Cheraso: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Leak testing is rapidly becoming a standard pro- cess requirement for many electronic products, partic- ularly those that must survive certain environmental specifications such as water resistance. In many instances, the electronics are packaged in a ported housing to allow for pressure equalization venting. Additionally, some products are powered by zinc air batteries that must "breath" in order to operate cor- rectly. A series of angled cosmetic grooves conceal the port on the pager. In order to leak test the product, a vacuum nozzle is applied to this area.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 13 July 1991

SELF-FORMING, NON-RESIDUE TEMPORARY GASKET FOR LEAK SEALING 3-D SURFACES

by John Cheraso, Ken Wasko and Doug Hendricks

  Leak testing is rapidly becoming a standard pro- cess requirement for many electronic products, partic- ularly those that must survive certain environmental specifications such as water resistance. In many instances, the electronics are packaged in a ported housing to allow for pressure equalization venting. Additionally, some products are powered by zinc air batteries that must "breath" in order to operate cor- rectly. A series of angled cosmetic grooves conceal the port on the pager. In order to leak test the product, a vacuum nozzle is applied to this area.

  In order to leak test with a vacuum device, a per- fect seal is required between the nozzle and the test product. If the product port area exhibits multiplanar surfaces due to complex styling or cosmetic grooves, then the necessary seal is difficult to obtain repeatably through the use of conventional gasketing techniques. To meet all process requirements to the pager, the gas- ket material had to conform to the port area grooves,

provide an airtight seal at low pressures and leave no residue on the housing surface. A commercially avail- able material adapted in a novel manner provides a perfect solution to all of these problems.

  The material is a bulk hot melt adhesive that is easily molded into the necessary washer or gasket configu...