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Method for a visually intuitive display of power delivery simulation results

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006273D
Publication Date: 2001-Dec-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a visually intuitive display of power delivery simulation results. Benefits include improved processing speed and improved reliability.

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Method for a visually intuitive display of power delivery simulation results

Disclosed is a method for a visually intuitive display of power delivery simulation results. Benefits include improved processing speed and improved reliability.

Background

      The disclosed method addresses the problem of the long, tedious, and error-prone process of extracting the results of power delivery simulations performed in a simulator to a visually intuitive form. The inputs to the power delivery simulations include the electrical characteristics of a motherboard, package, capacitors, and die. The outputs include maximum currents, steady-state currents, high-frequency voltage droops, and low-frequency voltage droops. In providing an efficient method of viewing the results, the disclosed program enables the electrical performance analysis of more complex, cost-optimized physical designs.

      Several conventional methods exist for solving the problem. Two of the methods use the SPICE .measure command. It creates a list of the requested values (for example, maximum currents, steady-state currents, and voltages) in the order in which they appear.

      The first method involves graphing the results of the applicable curve (for example, voltage and current) and using the cursor to determine the specific values of particular points on the curve to determine a required parameter. Examples of points on the curve include maximum conventional at node 49 and maximum voltage droop at node 5 from the initial value between 10 and 11 nanoseconds. This method is extremely time-consuming and highly prone to user error.

      A second method involves the .measure command and a visual inspection of the file that is created by this command, typically an .mt0 file. With this file and the effective naming of the requested values to measure, a map of the maximum currents at the die level or a map of the voltages across all nodes at a particular point in time can be created. For a large number of requested values, this method is also very time-consuming and highly prone to user error.

      A third method can be somewhat effective for power delivery simulations in which the nodes and element names do not change at any point. With perhaps a few hours of work for a simulation with relatively few .measure statements, a spreadsheet may be created from which the .mt0 file may be pasted in and automatically linked to other cells in order to create a more visually intuitive presentation of the results. This method seems to be more effective than the first two methods. Unfortunately, this method requires a time-consuming initial setup and requires a number of manual steps for each simulation run. Furthermore, if any changes are made to the circuit elements and nodes, the spreadsheet that was developed for a particular order and number of .measure statements may no longer be valid.

 


General description

      The disclosed method is a com...