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LOW SEDIMENT DETERGENT ADDITIVES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006307D
Publication Date: 2001-Dec-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

J. MCDONALD: INVENTOR

Abstract

The use of low silicon limes in the manufacture of detergent additives provides reduced impurity sediment levels, increased product yields and minimizes environmental effects of waste disposal.

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Low Sediment Detergent Additives

abstract

The use of low silicon limes in the manufacture of detergent additives provides reduced impurity sediment levels, increased product yields and minimizes environmental effects of waste disposal.

detailed description of the invention

Lubricating oil detergent additives, e.g., phenates and sulfonates, are manufactured using large amounts of lime (calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide) as a raw material.  The presence of silicon compounds in lime increases the level of impurities present during the manufacture of such detergent additives.  The silicon compounds in lime are mostly silicates.  These impurities are present as solid sediment in the detergent additive which must be removed to very low levels (below 0.02 volume percent) in order for the detergent additive to be used for its intended purpose.

An example of such a detergent additive is a commonly used sulfurized, overbased phenate in which the typical sediment level following manufacture is on the order of 1.0 volume percent.  The removal of this sediment requires the addition of a filter aid (such as diatomaceous earth, at an equal weight percent basis to the sediment being removed) followed by a filtration step to remove unreacted lime and sediment.  Addition of the filter aid facilitates filtration by improving the porosity of the filter cake to achieve an acceptable filtration rate.  The amount of filter aid used corresponds to the amount of sediment and also to the nature of the sediment.  For example, large round particles such as sand are easier to filter and require less filter aid than particles which are smaller or in the form of plates or needles.  The filtration step results in significant waste following filtration since the solid material discharged from the filter also contains not only the sediment from the detergent additive and the filter aid but also approximately 50 weight percent liquid material (composed of diluent oil and the detergent additive product).  Hence, there may be significant product lost in the filtration step.  Any means of reducing the sediment impurity reduces the amount of filter aid required to purify the detergent additive and also lowers the loss of product in the filter discharge.

An alternative method of removing sediment from detergent additives is centrifugation, usually done in expensive high-speed centri...