Browse Prior Art Database

"SUICIDE CORD" SAFETY PLUG

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006322D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Dec-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

David Burrage: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes the design of a plug which is intended to be the terminator of a high voltage line cord. It prevents shock to personnel through a moveable, spring- loaded sheath that insulates personnel from the high voltage contacts at all times, yet still allows metal to metal contact to a mating receptacle. The plug can also be polarized or equipped with a latch for added safety.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 14 December 1991

"SUICIDE CORD" SAFETY PLUG

by David Burrage, Vince DiCristofano, Steven Winkowski

ABSTRACT

  This article describes the design of a plug which is intended to be the terminator of a high voltage line cord. It prevents shock to personnel through a moveable, spring- loaded sheath that insulates personnel from the high voltage contacts at all times, yet still allows metal to metal contact to a mating receptacle. The plug can also be polarized or equipped with a latch for added safety.

  In a competitive manufacturing environment, it is desirable to keep set up and take down times as short as possible for each operation. An obvious step involved in testing products that are powered by 120VAC is to connect them to an AC wall outlet with a line cord. For product designs that incorporate UL approved AC receptacles and molded plastic line cords, it is very common to leave the line cord plugged into the 12OVAC wall outlet and to then connect (disconnect) the line cord to (from) the product at its receptacle rather than at the wall. The design of both the line cord and the mating receptacle ensures that the risk of shock to personnel is negligible.

  If, however, something other than a standard AC receptacle is used on the product, such as the terminal block shown in Figure A, a standard line cord cannot be used. This type of receptacle is designed for bare or stripped wires which can pose significant risk to person- nel if a live lie cord is handled casually. In addition, the product may sustain damage if the operator incorrectly connects the individual wires to the terminal block (e.g. reversing hot and ground)...