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Browse Prior Art Database

CREDIT-CARD ENCRYPTION WITH KEY STORAGE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006368D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Dec-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jim Van Bosch: AUTHOR

Abstract

The requirements and flexibility of encrypted radios continue to grow in the industry, With the complexity of todays communications equipment increasing, there exists the need for small encryption modules that arc easy to manufacture and implement into new products, while still employing a high level of security.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 15 May 1992

CREDIT-CARD ENCRYPTION WITH KEY STORAGE

by Jim Van Bosch

ABSTRACT

  The requirements and flexibility of encrypted radios continue to grow in the industry, With the complexity of todays communications equipment increasing, there exists the need for small encryption modules that arc easy to manufacture and implement into new products, while still employing a high level of security.

BACKGROUND

  Common topologies for secure communications equipment can be seen in Figure 1. In these radios, the secure communication devices consist of a basic radio with a module added internally to perform encryption. The encryption module in the radio has to be custom tailored both electrically and mechanically for each new product that comes out on the market. This takes time and has a high development cost.

  The encryption keys are entered into the radio via an external keyloader or via an OTAR sequence. The exter- nal keyloader has to be secured to avoid compromising the keys and is costly for. the user to buy. Access to keyloaders needs to be tracked to prevent unauthorized access and fabrication of keys.

  A password or key is used to prevent unauthorized access to the device. Problems exist in entering the password if a keypad is not present on the device. In addition, physical keys are often too large to be used on many products.

  When the device has actual encryption keys stored in it, the device needs to be locked or stored in a secure area. If multiple people are using the same device, such as police on various shifts, then each officer needs to know the password or have the password/key to oper- ate the device. This lowers the security of the system by allowing multiple people to have the same password and keys. It would be desirable to allow the user to be able to quickly remove the encryption algorithm and keys and store them in a compact form with that person. The

B Motorola. Inc. 1992

devices with the encryption modules removed could then be stored in public area. In addition, by giving each per- son a unique encryption module, the device could auto- matically log when and who used the device.

  Today's radios are large and bulky. Customers sim- ply want smaller radios that can be hidden. Shrinking the size of the encryption module would shrink the size of the radio. In addition, it would be desirable to elimi- nate the keyloader and replace it with a smaller substitute.

  Presently it is...