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Method for enhanced cooling of microprocessor components in a multiple server configuration utilizing vortex tubes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006372D
Publication Date: 2001-Dec-28
Document File: 5 page(s) / 120K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for enhanced cooling of microprocessor components in a multiple server configuration utilizing vortex tubes. Benefits include improved thermal performance and improved reliability.

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Method for enhanced cooling of microprocessor components in a multiple server configuration utilizing vortex tubes

Disclosed is a method for enhanced cooling of microprocessor components in a multiple server configuration utilizing vortex tubes. Benefits include improved thermal performance and improved reliability.

Background

              The power dissipation of microprocessors continues to grow rapidly. Because of constraints on the system chassis, the processor junction temperatures will rise dramatically and even result in thermal runaway unless techniques for advanced cooling are developed. The excessive rise in processor temperatures will result in lower CPU performance and/or damage to the electronic component.

              Conventionally, processors in server configurations are cooled by blowing room ambient air over a heatsink mounted on the silicon microprocessor chip. This solution is limited by the ambient air temperature, the efficiency of the heatsink, the air velocity produced by a fan located above the heatsink and others in the chassis, and the chassis volume (see Figure 1).

              Unfortunately, this air‐cooled solution is reaching the limits of the technology. The amount of heat that can be removed is proportional to the difference between the heatsink temperature and the ambient air temperature. As a result, the temperature of the heatsink and the CPU chip has been rising as the processor power dissipation goes up. The only way to continue with an air-cooled solution is to introduce ambient air at a substantially lower temperature.

              Vortex tubes were invented in the 1930's by French physicist Georges Ranque. When compressed air is released into the tube through the vortex generator, hot air comes out of one end of the tube and cold air out the other. A small valve in the hot-air end that is adjustable with the handy control knob, lets you adjust the volume and temperature of air released from the cold end. The vortex generator (an interchangeable, stationary part) regulates the volume of compressed air, allowing you to alter the air flows and temperature ranges you can produce with the tube.

      Cold fraction is the percentage of input compressed air that is released through the cold end of the tube. As a rule of thumb, the less cold air released, the colder that air will be. You adjust the cold fraction with the control knob. Cold fraction is also a function of the type of vortex generator that is in the tube, that is, a high cold fraction or a low cold fraction generator.

              Most industrial process applications use a high cold fraction (above 50%). A high cold-...