Browse Prior Art Database

Method for an anti-scratch jig by Reginald P. T. Taar

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006381D
Publication Date: 2001-Dec-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 1K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for an anti-scratch jig. Benefits include improved yield, reduced scratch defects, and improved ease of use for wafer & die visual inspection.

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Method for an anti-scratch jig by Reginald P. T. Taar

Disclosed is a method for an anti-scratch jig. Benefits include improved yield, reduced scratch defects, and improved ease of use for wafer & die visual inspection.

Background

This method was conceived out of the issue of scratches generated during sorting & inspection of wafers at die prep affecting yield output.

During wafer sorting and inspection, operators inserts and reinserts film frames. Scratches can result when the operator lifts and tilts the frame when it is not yet completely pulled out or returned (see Figure 1). While wafers are extracted one at a time, scratches can be generated on the wafer being extracted caused by the frame edge of the previous film frame. Similarly, the wafer frame being extracted can also cause scratches on the succeeding wafer.

Description

The disclosed method is a jig comprised of stainless steel parts and plastic wall sidings from defective silicon wafer cassettes used by production. By design, the jig is simple. It uses recyclable scrap wafer cassette wall sidings with no electronics and no moving parts. The wall sidings are the essential components of the jig because the slots that hold the wafer frames define the functionality of the jig.

Plastic wall sidings are held in position by stainless steel holders. The wafer cassette is placed onto the jig so that is does not move while being used. The cassette slots are directly in-line with the slots of the plastic wall sidings of the jig. Wafer film frames are pulled out and returned without scratching from insertion/reinsertion during sorting and inspection (see Figure 2). Scratches are avoided via the parallel alignment of ins...